A 13-axle tractor-trailer unit hauls a tank from B.C. port facilities. (B.C. Ministry of Transportation)

B.C. fast-tracks ‘superload’ trucks to ports, Alberta border

13-axle big rigs no longer need to wait for special permit

The B.C. government and Lower Mainland municipalities have completed a fast-track permit system to allow oversize loads and trucks with up to 13 axles to carry massive equipment components to the Alberta border via Highway 16.

The “superload” route connects with Alberta’s high load corridor, a network of designated routes built to haul drill rigs, tanks and other heavy industrial loads that can’t be broken down into smaller segments. On the B.C. side, the new “project cargo corridor” permit eliminates a wait of up to 12 days that was required to assess each oversize load and route to see if it can be allowed to hit the road without damage.

“This is expected to save the trucking industry time and increase confidence for carriers and shippers in order to attract more specialized products through B.C. ports,” the transportation ministry said in a statement Monday.

The new permit system allows trucks with between eight and 13 axles, gross vehicle weight up to 125,000 kg, width up to five metres and height up to 4.88 metres to make the trip.

The new permits allow travel by oversize loads between two ports, Fraser Surrey Docks and Lynnterm East Gate in North Vancouver, and the highway system through the Fraser Valley to Alberta.

RELATED: Pipeline companies competing for skilled workers

RELATED: Longer trucks save forest companies money, fuel

RELATED: B.C. company recognized for innovation in forestry

The ministry has signed information-sharing agreements with municipalities along the corridor, North Vancouver, Vancouver, Burnaby, Surrey, Langley and Abbotsford.

The change takes effect as work gets underway on the Trans Mountain pipeline twinning project that runs from Edmonton to Burnaby.

B.C. previously approved the use of 13-axle oversize trucks to haul logs on the Highway 16 corridor in northwestern B.C. Canfor began using the nine-axle trailers, built at Freflyt in Vanderhoof, to make transport of timber from remote locations more efficient.

The large loads also helped the industry deal with a shortage of truck drivers, as well as reducing fuel use and greenhouse gas emissions.

The log trailer and a 10-axle trailer for hauling chips were developed with assistance from FPInnovations, a private not-for-profit research and development organization specializing in wood products.


@tomfletcherbc
tfletcher@blackpress.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

BC legislature

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Vancouver Island family loses everything after house fire next door

Friends of Paula and Clifford Lucas are raising funds to help the young family

North Island College announces 2020 graduation award winners

North Island College has announced the award recipients for the 2020 Graduation… Continue reading

Alberni Valley volunteer wins BC Hockey award

Kellie Steel named one of nine unsung heroes through COVID-19

‘Someone knows something’: a look into Vancouver Island missing persons with interactive map

There are more than three dozen people listed as missing throughout Vancouver Island

Provincial COVID-19 data can now be used for B.C. to prepare for a second wave

In the past week, B.C. has seen a slight spike in daily test-positive case counts

Wage subsidy will be extended until December amid post-COVID reopening: Trudeau

Trudeau said the extension will ‘give greater certainty and support to businesses’

Trudeau apologizes for not recusing himself from WE decision

He says his and his family’s longtime involvement with the WE organization should have kept him out of the discussions

Islanders want BC Ferries to follow order that lets residents board before tourists

For ferry-dependent communities, ferries are often the sole practical lifeline to work, school or medical appointments.

Washington’s NFL team drops ‘Redskins’ name after 87 years

The franchise was given the name back in 1933, when it was still in Boston

Genetic detectives begin work to trace spread of COVID-19 in Canada

The kinds of genetic technology being used for this project did not exist when SARS hit Canada in 2003

Sports fishers protest Fraser River Chinook closures

Public Fishery Alliance wants hatchery fish open for harvest

B.C. Ferries increasing passenger capacity after COVID-19 restrictions

Transport Canada 50-per-cent limit being phased out, no current plans to provide masks

Shellfish industry get funds to clean up at Island sites and beyond

Businesses can apply to cover half of costs to clean up so-called ‘ghost gear’

Most Read