Is that a big iceberg in the Alberni Harbour? No, it is the former Harbour Quay clocktower, wrapped in plastic to allow workers to continue renovating the tower. The clock is coming down and a new ‘story tower’ depicting the history of Tseshaht First Nation will be unveiled sometime in 2022. (SUSAN QUINN/ Alberni Valley News)

Is that a big iceberg in the Alberni Harbour? No, it is the former Harbour Quay clocktower, wrapped in plastic to allow workers to continue renovating the tower. The clock is coming down and a new ‘story tower’ depicting the history of Tseshaht First Nation will be unveiled sometime in 2022. (SUSAN QUINN/ Alberni Valley News)

Harbour Quay ‘story tower’ renovation continues

Tower on Port Alberni’s waterfront now wrapped in white construction plastic

Renovation work is progressing on the former clocktower at Harbour Quay, on Port Alberni’s waterfront.

Work began in mid-November to repair the tower and remove the clock, which has not worked for several years. The tower has been a feature at Harbour Quay, a collection of shops, eateries and park space at the end of Argyle Street.

READ: Construction work begins on Port Alberni’s aging clocktower

After scaffolding was erected around the tower, the structure was wrapped in white plastic—causing a few people to refer to it as a “giant iceberg” on the waterfront.

The clock will not be replaced: instead, the structure will become a “story tower” with artwork depicting the history of Tseshaht First Nation. The waterfront from Polly’s Point up to the mouth of Rogers Creek and along the Somass River was once home to traditional Tseshaht village sites, and First Nations artwork on the new tower will tell the story of these villages.

The Starboard Grill, a restaurant located at the base of the tower, is still open for business. The main entrance has been moved to the side to accommodate construction.

City director of engineering Rob Dickinson said previously he is “optimistic” that work will be complete before the 2022 tourism season is in full swing.

Alberni ValleyPort Alberni

 

The stripping down of the clocktower at Harbour Quay on Port Alberni’s waterfront began in earnest earlier in November. The tower is encased in scaffolding as workers begin to transform the clock—which hasn’t operated in years—to a Tseshaht First Nations-based story tower. (Nov. 26, 2021) (SUSAN QUINN/ Alberni Valley News)

The stripping down of the clocktower at Harbour Quay on Port Alberni’s waterfront began in earnest earlier in November. The tower is encased in scaffolding as workers begin to transform the clock—which hasn’t operated in years—to a Tseshaht First Nations-based story tower. (Nov. 26, 2021) (SUSAN QUINN/ Alberni Valley News)