United Way opens grants to help charities tackle social issues

Charities north of the Malahat can apply for grants $2,000 to $20,000

To better tackle social issues, such as the rise in homelessness and the deepening of poverty, United Way Central & Northern Vancouver Island (UWCNVI) offers grants to local charities.

“Our donors are incredible people and because they care and give, United Way can once again invest in effective programs through Community Partner grants,” said Signy Madden, Executive Director of UWCNVI. “Thousands of people turn to United Way funded programs for help through the year. Every dollar given to United Way counts; even small donations add up and you can see how it’s making a difference in your community.”

Registered charities operating in Cowichan, Central Island, Comox Valley and Campbell River can submit a letter of interest April 19 to May 10 online at uwcnvigrants.ca/2019.

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UWCNVI offers Community Partner Grants to charities providing local services. In Campbell River micro grants are available for up to $2,000 per program while Comox Valley agencies are eligible to apply for grants up to $5,000 per program. In the Central Island agencies are eligible to apply for grants up to $10,000 per program and in Cowichan micro grants are available for up to $2,000 per program.

Community Development Grants are also offered in each region in response to emerging community needs, and to encourage community agencies to work together collaboratively on pressing issues such as the opioid crisis, affordable housing, homelessness and support for programs in Indigenous communities and agencies. These $5,000 to $20,000 grants are selected through local agencies and issue-based coalitions.

UWCNVI accepts donations year round. For more information contact dd@uwcnvi.ca or call 250-591-8731.



c.vanreeuwyk@blackpress.ca

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