A tear rolls down through the colors of the Ukrainian flag on the cheek of Ukranian Oleksandra Yashan of Arlington, Va., as she becomes emotional during a vigil to protest the Russian invasion of Ukraine in Lafayette Park in front of the White House in Washington on Feb. 24. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

A tear rolls down through the colors of the Ukrainian flag on the cheek of Ukranian Oleksandra Yashan of Arlington, Va., as she becomes emotional during a vigil to protest the Russian invasion of Ukraine in Lafayette Park in front of the White House in Washington on Feb. 24. (AP Photo/Andrew Harnik)

EDITORIAL: Ukrainians seeing true loss of freedom

‘This is what losing your freedom looks like – waking up to war’

Imagine finding your life suddenly set on a course where no choice or action you take can set things right. This is what losing your freedom looks like – waking up to war.

The situation in Europe is hard to comprehend, and it can be draining to try to keep up with the news. But if there is a key takeaway for Canadian citizens, it must be gratitude for life in a free and democratic country, where people do not live in fear.

Accusations that our prime minister is behaving as an authoritarian have been put into perspective by international headlines. Russian President Vladimir Putin, 69, passed a law last year which will potentially allow him to be president until 2036 – this is what a true authoritarian leader looks like.

Ukrainians have been fighting valiantly, but the situation is delicate and unfolding rapidly. Putin has threatened countries that support Ukraine in a military capacity with “such consequences that you have never encountered in your history.”

That is not to say there is nothing people in Canada and other countries can do to help support Ukraine. Premier John Horgan has suggested residents with disposable income who want to help, look at donating to the UN High Commission on Refugees.

We can welcome refugees with open arms, we can go to a Ukrainian church and show support or fly a Ukrainian flag.

We should all be careful what we share online. Now is the time to check sources and share only accurate, verified information. There is too much happening too quickly for anyone to keep track, and it is in these situations that misinformation thrives.

The world is changing fast and information has never been as readily available as it is today – if it is exhausting to keep up with or causing you undue stress, unplug. Go for a walk, hug your family and be grateful for where we live.

— Black Press

Ukraine

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