Shea finds his own voice on stage

When singer-songwriter Scott Shea went on a spiritual trip to the other side of the globe, he got more than he bargained for.

Life has taken Scott Shea on a world trip of adventure.

When singer-songwriter Scott Shea went on a spiritual trip to the other side of the globe, he got more than he bargained for.

“I broke my foot in Thailand in the jungle. I had to walk for three days with a busted foot with bamboo crutches and I had blisters under my arms,” Shea recalled. “I got heat stroke in India and almost died. I got shot at in Cambodia. There was tons of stuff that happened.”

Despite all the trouble, Shea’s eight-month global journey had a profound impact on his life.

“It was life changing. I felt really moved,” he said. “It gave me a different handle for living in Canada and what potentials we have.”

In the years following Shea has been realizing his potential as a musician.

On Friday (April 10), Shea will perform at Char’s Landing. His stop in Port Alberni is part of a tour that will see Shea play to crowds in British Columbia, Ontario, Quebec and the Maritimes.

“Port Alberni, I am excited,” he said. “I am really excited. I can’t wait to get out there.”

Shea grew up in Aurora, Ont., and became involved in music at an early age thanks in part to his father, Red Shea, who was an influential guitarist and is best known for his work with Gordon Lightfoot and Ian Tyson.

“They used to call me Hollywood back in high school,” Shea said. “I was always singing and humming and making up little tunes and limericks all the time. It just seemed to be what I loved to do.”

Shea said despite his father’s reputation, he wanted to discover the guitar on his own.

“I wanted my dad to teach me, but I didn’t,” he said. “I didn’t like the idea of my dad teaching me. I liked the idea of me doing it on my own, which is kind of the way he has always been.”

As a teenager, Shea met and fell in love with a girl while skiing in Vermont. The two quickly became an item and he moved to Goshen, N.Y. to live with her.

“I ended up doing a bunch of landscaping with her father and then on the weekends we would all go down to Ocean Grove  and Asbury Park [N.J.].”

It was during those trips to the Garden State that Shea would bring his guitar and busk along the boardwalks.

“It was most cover tunes … but I was playing some of my original stuff,” he said. “You’re kind of young and naïve thinking that you’re going to get discovered when you’re out there jamming away.”

After nearly a year of living in New York the two broke up and Shea returned to Canada, where he formed a band called The Sheas with his brother.

“My dad taught my brother and he was so good that having him on board just made me look better,” he said.

Shea said that his father, who died in 2008, never pressured him into music and actually discouraged him from pursing a career in the industry.

“As a matter of fact it was the complete opposite. He loves music but he hated the music business. He couldn’t stand it. He didn’t like the way it was run and he thought it was very dishonest,” Shea said.

“He didn’t put a lot of emphasis on us to do music. He knew that is what I wanted to do but he didn’t go out of his way to help in any way.”

During The Sheas’ life span they would release an album called Zero to One and opened for Big Sugar and Blue Rodeo.

“You know, of course, as brothers, things kind of went sour and my wife got pregnant and I had to find a real job,” he said.

After taking time off from the music industry to work and travel the world, Shea decided to get back to performing live shows and doing what he loves.

“Writing songs is just something I do,” Shea said. “I can’t think of anything else I want to do.”

Last year Shea released his first solo record, Let it Storm, which was recorded at Arlyn Studios in Texas and was produced by Gordie Johnson.

He said the record has a Gordon Lightfoot feel to it simply because of his father’s influence on him.

“I have that Lightfoot sound because I know my dad was responsible for a lot of it. I think that being his son I think that is in me and I can’t help it,” Shea said. “The last thing I want to do is be my father.”

For more information visit www.scottsheasongs.com.

 

Nicholas Pescod is the arts & entertainment editor at the Nanaimo News Bulletin.

Just Posted

Rosalind Chapman seeks seat on Port Alberni city council

Community volunteer and longtime Alberni Valley resident Rosalind Chapman will seek a… Continue reading

Accident causes power outage on Beaver Creek Road

One sent to West Coast General Hospital in crash

Inside the music: step behind the curtain at the venerable Vancouver Island Music Festival

Big Read: VIMF in the Comox Valley exemplifies the spirit of an Island summer music festival

Save-On-Foods donates to summer kids’ program in Port Alberni

Food bank takes over from breakfast programs once summer vacation starts

West Coast Hockey Prep Camp draws nearly 1,000 players to Port Alberni

History-making Korean hockey coach joins league of celebrity instructors

Here’s what you need to know about Day 2 at the BC Games

From equestrian to volleyball to swimming, all 18 events in full swing here in the Cowichan Valley

Two significant wildfires burning in southeastern B.C.

More than 20 fires were burning in the Southeast Fire Centre as of Saturday afternoon

Volunteers provide the glue that keeps BC Games moving

The 2018 Cowichan Summer Games had more than 2,300 volunteers on hand across Vancouver Island

No Name brand chicken nuggets recalled due to possible salmonella

Canadian Food Inspection Agency says multiple illnesses reported in B.C., Alberta and Ontario

Lodeiro scores twice to help Sounders beat Whitecaps 2-0

Seattle’s Nicolas Lodeiro opened the scoring in the fifth minute when he converted a penalty kick

Race walker breaks 18-year-old BC Games record

Zone 6 athlete Olivia Lundman crossed finish line with ease, to loud cheers in Cowichan

PHOTO GALLERY: BC Games Day 2

A brief look at action from the 2018 BC Summer Games in the Cowichan Valley

BC Wildfire update on 14 major Okanagan blazes

Watch the media briefing on the current fire situation in the Okanagan.

UPDATED: Kinder Morgan pipeline protesters defy eviction order

Demonstrators at Camp Cloud in Burnaby say they won’t leave, but will meet with city officials

Most Read