Alberni’s Salvation Army to subdivide and sell field property

The Salvation Army hopes to subdivide the two-acre lot behind its Redford Street headquarters, which a developer can then build and sell 12 residential lots.

Captain Neil Wilkinson shows the two-acre piece of property behind the Salvation Army's Redford Street building it wants to sub-divide into 12 residential lots and sell. The building and services are staying put though

Captain Neil Wilkinson shows the two-acre piece of property behind the Salvation Army's Redford Street building it wants to sub-divide into 12 residential lots and sell. The building and services are staying put though

Less land tax burden is prompting the Alberni Valley chapter of the Salvation Army to subdivide the playing field behind its main building on Redford Street, captain Neil Wilkinson said.

The Salvation Army hopes to subdivide the two-acre lot into 12 lots which can be developed into separate residences, he said.

The $3,600 in land taxes and $10,000 in building maintenance costs that the organization pays annually was getting to be too much.

“It’s a tax burden on the congregation now,” Wilkinson said.

“The money we raise through the land sale with help defray maintenance costs.”

The initiative has been in the works for awhile, Wilkinson said, but the organization was waiting for the right time to spring it.

The existing building is staying put as are the services.

“We’re content to continue meeting our needs on our existing footprint,” Wilkinson said

“Our services are not impacted at all – this only involves the field.”

The land will be listed for sale with a local real estate firm on Friday.

There have already been a couple of cursory inquiries but nothing firm, Wilkinson said.

Neighbouring home owners were apprised of the development personally in a letter from Wilkinson delivered over the past week.

“We have decided not to develop the open space…on our property,” the letter noted.

“Instead, we have opted to subdivide the land and sell…as a parcel for development potential.”

City planner Scott Smith said he’d only heard about the move informally to date.

The property is zoned P-1 institutional and no formal application had been made yet to rezone it.

“It would be subject to rezoning, but that doesn’t preclude it from being marketed as having single-family residence subdivision potential,” Smith said.

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