Effective at noon on Sept. 18, all open fires will be permitted throughout the Coastal Fire Centre’s jurisdiction due to reduced wildfire risks in the region. (Nan Palmero/Flickr)

Break out the tiki torches: Open fires allowed again in B.C.’s coastal region

All open fires allowed effective at noon on Sept. 18

All open fires will be permitted throughout the Coastal Fire Centre’s jurisdiction effective at noon.

The BC Wildfire Service announced it is lifting the burn ban in the region on Sept. 18 due to reduced risk for wildfires.

With the lift of the ban, Category 2 open fires will now be permitted as well as the use of tiki torches, burn barrels, fireworks, sky lanterns and binary exploding targets.

READ MORE: Category 2 open fire ban to be lifted for Cariboo fire jurisdiction

Campfires and Category 3 open fires, which are larger than two metres high and three metres wide, remain permitted throughout the Coastal Fire Centre. However, anyone lighting a Category 3 open fire must obtain a free burn registration number by calling 1-888-797-1717.

The Coastal Fire Centre covers the entire area west of the Coast Mountain Range from the U.S.-Canada border at Manning Park, including Tweedsmuir South Provincial Park in the north, the Sunshine Coast, the Lower Mainland, Vancouver Island, the Gulf Islands and Haida Gwaii.

READ MORE: Beach fire ban debate reignited in Tofino

Local governments may still have their own burning restrictions in place, so people should check with local authorities before lighting any fire of any size.

Fire prevention officer Ted Main told Black Press Media that Abbotsford, Chilliwack, Langley and Mission all have strict burning regulations that do not allow burn barrows, sky lanterns or fireworks, and burning of agricultural waste is restricted to farm properties in the rural area with an approved permit.

Main said in Abbotsford, burning is restricted to farm properties that meet clearances to neighboring occupied residents.

“Pile sizes are also restricted to 3 metres in diameter by 1 metre in height for agricultural burning with camp fires being totally restricted unless special approval is given by the fire chief,” Main said in an email.

“In Abbotsford anyone caught burning garbage or burning agricultural waste without a permit receive a fine ($400) and if they continue to burn illegally the fines increase.

“In Langley and Chilliwack their burning permit season is only March and April in the spring and October and November in the fall.”

READ MORE: Campfires allowed in Mission, despite burning ban



karissa.gall@blackpress.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Squash Club in Port Alberni has until March 2020 to fix façade that has been under construction for years

Owner Randy Brown says ‘no problem’ to have building fixed by March deadline

Two pedestrians struck by vehicles in Port Alberni

Fire chief reminds motorists, pedestrians to be cautious

Courtenay-Alberni NDP MP Gord Johns says Scheer’s resignation not surprising

Pressure is on NDP leader Jagmeet Singh, as the lone major party leader remaining in the opposition

Drag racers ask for three-year lease at Alberni Valley Airport to race

AVDRA is pursuing a location for a permanent drag racing facility in Port Alberni

BCHL: Alberni Valley Bulldogs acquire veteran forward from QMJHL

Matthew Grouchy set to join the Bulldogs on Friday, Dec. 13

VIDEO: Feds give update on flying clearance for Santa’s sled

Transport Minister Marc Garneau has this message for the country’s children

Investigators confirm three died in B.C. plane crash

Transport Canada provides information bulletin

Prime Minister sets 2025 timeline for plan to remove fish farms from B.C. waters

Foes heartened by plan to transition aquaculture found in Fisheries minister mandate letter

Canada’s Attorney General looking to larger reforms on doctor-assisted death

The Quebec Superior Court gave Ottawa just six months — until March 2020 — to amend the law

Navigating ‘fever phobia’: B.C. doctor gives tips on when a sick kid should get to the ER

Any temperature above 38 C is considered a fever, but not all cases warrant a trip to the hospital

Wagon wheels can now be any size: B.C. community scraps 52 obsolete bylaws

They include an old bylaw regulating public morals

Indigenous mother wins $20,000 racial discrimination case against Vancouver police

Vancouver Police Board ordered to pay $20,000 and create Indigenous-sensitivity training

Sentencing for B.C. father who murdered two young daughters starts Monday

The bodies of Aubrey, 4, and Chloe, 6, were found in Oak Bay father’s apartment Dec. 25, 2017

B.C. vet talks tips for winter travel with pets

Going to see the vet the day before a trip is never a good idea

Most Read