Cantimber testing draws few complaints

Cantimber underwent stack testing at the facility from Nov. 3 to 10 to check for potential chemicals in the VOC's.

Cantimber Biotech says minimal complaints were submitted during the mill’s eight days of operation in early November.

Cantimber underwent stack testing at the facility, near the corner of Harbour Road and Bruce Street, to check for potential chemicals in the volatile organic compounds (VOC) and to monitor emissions inside the building during full operation.

A warm up procedure began on Nov. 3 and operations ran until Nov. 10.

“This was the first time where we actually had a full operation of our new upgrade which is the secondary combustion chamber, which are designed to burn and destroy any VOC’s that are in the process,” said Michael Liu, director of project development and research at Cantimber. “Everything has to be going through the secondary combustion chamber to get burned and then it goes through the stack.”

Liu said an online observation and complaint submission form was available to neighbouring residents throughout the testing period.

On Nov. 5, Liu said a complaint was filed from a resident who noticed an “unpleasant  campfire and wood burning smell.”

After receiving the complaint, Liu said a sophisticated air-monitoring system was set up in the proximity of where the smell was said to be coming from.

After an engineer reviewed the data from the monitoring system, and what the mill was burning at that time, Liu said it was determined that at the time of the complaint the mill was only burning propane and charcoal.

“There were no wood chips and there were no firewood at that time,” Liu said. “Based on our wind direction data … it would have been a wood stove smell from nearby residents.”

Liu said other than the one complaint, three observations were submitted that did not require further follow up.

“As of now we have been notified there may be a written complaint that may be submitted but we haven’t received it at the moment,” Liu said.

Results from the stack tests should be available to the public within a couple of weeks, Liu assumes.

Cantimber shuts down annually from Nov. 10 to early January.

Contrary to the information provided by Liu, First Avenue resident Lesley Wright said she filed two complaints through Cantimber’s online submission form during the stack testing phase.

“There were two instances that occurred for me, one was on Nov. 9 at about 8 a.m. and the other one was on Nov. 13 at about 9:30 p.m.,” Wright said.

Wright said during the testing she noticed a smell that she describes as acrid.

“It almost starts burning in your nose,” she said. “I recognized that smell right away. I know the difference between wood smoke and this other smell.”

After submitting her complaints, a thank-you message appeared confirming that the forms were sent, but Wright didn’t hear anything further from the company regarding her complaints.

 

karly.blats@albernivalleynews.com

facebook.com/albernivalleynews

twitter.com/alberninews

 

 

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Missing Port Alberni man found deceased

47-year-old had been missing since late June: RCMP

Longtime volunteer retires from Port Alberni’s Abbeyfield House

Doreen Bissette honoured for two decades of volunteerism

Savard prevails with best gross score at Alberni Golf Club

Men’s club prepares for ‘waltz’ on July 12

EDITORIAL: We need to check our ‘plate hate’

Suspicious border activity can be reported

Feds announce $8.3M to deal with ‘ghost’ fishing gear in B.C. waters

Ghost gear accounts for up to 70 per cent of all macro-plastics in the ocean by weight

B.C. identifies 20 new COVID-19 cases, travellers specified in count

Pandemic total 3,028 cases, 51 people from outside Canada

Campaign aims to raise $50K for young family of deceased Vancouver Island skydiver

James Smith, 34, died July 5 following incident in Nanoose Bay

Survey, hotline launched amid probe into racist blood-alcohol guessing game at B.C. hospital

Mary Ellen Turpel-Lafond has been appointed to lead an investigation by Health Minister Adrian Dix

Canadian policing organization calls for decriminalization of simple illicit drug possession

Canadian Association of Chiefs of Police want policing focus of opioid crisis to be replaced with a health one

B.C. ports part of data integration project to protect marine ecosystems

The $1.2 M federally funded program will draw crucial baseline data from Canada’s three coastlines

Filing deadline in RCMP sexual-harassment class-action extended due to COVID-19

Plaintiffs now have until January 2021 to submit claims for up to $222,000

Jamie Bacon pleads guilty to charge in Surrey Six case

The plea brings an end to a complex legal case that has spanned more than a decade

Hefty undeclared driver charges piling up, ICBC warns customers

Average extra penalty $2,971 after an at-fault accident

RCMP disarm man experiencing mental health crisis

The male pulled a knife on officers and then held it to his own throat expressing a desire to die

Most Read