A Manitoba man convicted of sending bombs to his ex-wife and two lawyers will learn how long he will be behind bars today. Guido Amsel, 49, is shown in this undated handout photo. THE CANADIAN PRESS/HO - Winnipeg Police Service

Convicted Winnipeg letter-bomber sentenced to life in prison

Guido Amsel sent letter bombs to his ex-wife and two law firms

A Manitoba man who sent letter bombs to his ex-wife and two law firms that had represented her has been sentenced to life in prison with no chance of parole for at least 10 years.

Guido Amsel, who was convicted earlier this year on four counts of attempted murder, has also been sentenced to an additional 12 years for an earlier attempt on his ex-wife’s life.

Amsel, who is 52, sent letter bombs to his former wife, Iris, and two Winnipeg lawyers who represented her in the summer of 2015.

One of the devices went off and severely injured lawyer Maria Mitousis, who lost her right hand in the explosion.

RELATED: Florida man charged after weeklong bomb-package scare

Amsel testified during his trial that he was being set up by his former wife and others and that evidence had been planted against him.

Provincial court Judge Tracey Lord said Amsel has not accepted responsibility or shown any remorse for the attacks that put many people at risk.

“He showed not only a callous and vengeful intent toward the specific targets of the devices, but also an indiscriminate disregard for the lives and safety of others in the community,” Lord said Thursday.

“He has not taken responsibility for his actions and … moreover, he has attempted to place responsibility on others for these offences, and alleges corruption at all levels of the justice system.”

The bomb that injured Mitousis was placed in a recording device. A note attached to it instructed her to press the enter button, which set off the explosion.

Mitousis told court in her victim impact statement earlier this year that Amsel’s actions were that of a coward.

“I wear the scars of the explosion on my face and on my body,” she told court at the time.

RELATED: Man accused of mailing bomb to his brother in B.C. has died

She said after the sentencing was over she planned to move on with her life, continue her return to work and put Amsel behind her.

“After this is over, I will forget him and he will disappear from my consciousness.”

Kelly Geraldine Malone, The Canadian Press

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Port Alberni prepares to welcome hundreds of Indigenous youth delegates

Gathering Our Voices event will take place in the Alberni Valley from March 19-22

Beaver Creek club looking for name for new park

The Beaver Creek Community Hall is holding an online contest

Franklin Expedition exhibit opens at Alberni Valley Museum

Echoes in the Ice: Finding Franklin’s Ship runs until June 8 in Port Alberni

Port Alberni’s Smood skates with Vancouver Canucks

Minor hockey player chosen as ‘seventh man’ for NHL game

Port Alberni’s art centre welcomes $19K donation

100 Women Who Care choose Rollin Art Centre for latest donation

Defiant vigil starts healing in New Zealand after massacre

Police say the gunman in the shooting that killed 50 acted alone

Canada extends Iraq and Ukraine military missions to 2021 and 2022

Extension is part of efforts to curb Russian aggression and to fight against Islamic militants

WestJet suspends 2019 financial guidance after Boeing 737 Max grounded

The company has 13 Boeing 737 Max 8 aircraft grounded by regulators after the Ethiopian crash

Dutch tram shooting suspect arrested, say police

Police say three people were killed in the shooting Monday and five wounded

B.C. poverty plan combines existing spending, housing programs

Target is to lift 140,000 people out of poverty from 2016 level

Avalanche warning issued for all B.C. mountains

Warm weather to increase avalanche risk: Avalanche Canada

Privy Council clerk Michael Wernick retires

Jody Wilson-Raybould has accused Wernick of pressuring her to head off criminal charges for SNC-Lavalin

Temperature records dating back to 1947 broken in B.C.

The Squamish airport recorded the hottest temperature in the province (and Canada) on Sunday: 21.3 C

B.C. First Nations’ intake of essential nutrients could drop by 31%: study

Professors project the nutrient decrease by 2050 if climate change mitigation continues as is

Most Read