Deer shot through ear with target arrow: conservation

Hunting might be a popular hobby in the Alberni Valley but it’s illegal within city limits, says conservation officer Steve Ackles.

A deer with an arrow pierced through its ear eats from a plant pot in a yard at Eighth Avenue and Alderwood last week.

Hunting might be a popular hobby in the Alberni Valley but it’s illegal within city limits, says conservation officer Steve Ackles.

Despite this, Ackles discovered a deer with its ear pierced by an arrow at Eighth Avenue and Alderwood Street this weekend—right in the middle of the city.

“This is probably the third one in this town this year,” said Ackles.

“What’s disturbing is that people are hunting within city limits.”

The arrow used was from a recurve or longbow, said Ackles, but sometimes more powerful weapons are used.

“It isn’t as powerful as a crossbow but the last one was a crossbow,” he said. A crossbow bolt can travel a fair distance and even punch through multiple walls, he added.

When deer are hit by any type of arrow, the consequences can be deadly for the animal.

“I’ve had to put deer down or immobilize them to pull the arrows out when they’ve had a chance of survival…a lot of times they’ll walk around with those arrows through them for days or weeks till we can get to them,” he said.

But even when Ackles does find the injured deer, trying to get the arrows out does more harm than good.

“People don’t realize that immobilization on an animal is extremely stressful. Deer especially, sometimes they die from what’s called ‘capture myopathy’,” he said.

“With the stress of the capture, they can die up to two weeks later. Their system shuts down, they don’t eat as much.”

Even if the shock doesn’t kill the deer, the weather this time of year might.

“They can’t regulate their body heat when we put them under with those drugs, so I could successfully immobilize it, take the arrow out, do my best to leave it in a good position under a tree for it to come out of the drugs… but it’s going to get hypothermia.”

With the deadly consequences of shooting at deer, Ackles said that the behaviour needs to stop.

“I’d like to talk to whoever has done this and get that behaviour stopped,” said Ackles.

While accidents happen, care needs to be taken if ever shooting outdoors. And if the shooting was intentional?

“If I deem that the person that was doing it had intent, I’d charge them. You’re not allowed to hunt within city limits and there is no open hunting season. It’s an unlawful act.”

Anyone who knows anything about deer being shot within city limits is encouraged to call 1-877-952-RAPP (7277) or #7277 on a cell phone. Those reporting any information can remain anonymous.

reporter@albernivalleynews.com

facebook.com/albernivalleynews

twitter.com/alberninews

 

Just Posted

Knacker’s Yard brings Celtic sound to Port Alberni

Eight-piece band will be returning to Alberni Valley for a west coast party

Alberni’s Anne Ostwald named a finalist for Premier’s Award

Alberni District Secondary School teacher encourages students to find their passion

Tofino and Ucluelet prepare for daytime Hwy. 4 closures and eight-hour power outage

“We know that there’s never a good time for an outage and thank the community for their patience.”

Port Alberni’s Healthy Harvest Farm closing

Operation will merge with Hupacasath Community Garden

Sproat Lake hosts fall dragon boat regatta

Port Alberni’s Sproat Ness Dragons earn third place

Are you feeling lazy? That’s OK – it’s just science

UBC study shows that humans are hardwired to prefer being sloth-like

LETTER: Who do we blame for the tragedy of Marissa Shen’s death?

The B.C. girl was killed in a Burnaby park last July

Competition tribunal to hear B.C.-based case on airline food starting in October

The competition commissioner argued Vancouver airport authority had exploited its market position

Seek compromise with U.S. on cannabis at border, lawyers urge Ottawa

U.S. Customs and Border Protection agency sent tremors through Canada’s burgeoning cannabis sector

Trudeau says Canada wants to see ‘movement’ before signing revised NAFTA deal

Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland is back in Washington in search of a way to bridge divide

Wet weather means all types of burning, forest use OK in Coastal region

Campfires, open fires no larger than two metres by three metres, and all types of forest use allowed

Young people need us to act on climate change, McKenna tells G7 ministers

Catherine McKenna led off the three-day Halifax gathering Wednesday

B.C. woman facing animal cruelty charges after emaciated dog seized

Kira, a Rottweiler, had kidney and bladder infections

Most Read