Chinook salmon. (File photo)

Feds and B.C. First Nations agree to better access to commercial fishing

Coastal First Nations sign agreement on behalf of seven nations on B.C’s central and north coasts

The federal government and a group representing seven First Nations on B.C.’s north and central coasts have signed an agreement on the management and expansion of community-based fisheries into Indigenous land.

On Friday, Chief Marilyn Slett, president of the Coastal First Nations organization, took part in a signing ceremony in Vancouver with Fisheries Minister Jonathan Wilkinson, Indigenous Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett and representatives from six other First Nations.

READ MORE: B.C. First Nations get clarity on fishing rights from top court

“This agreement will get families and fishers back on the water and re-establish a small boat fleet in our communities,” Slett said in a news release. “By working together – on a nation-to-nation basis – we will provide opportunities for our communities to fully participate in the fishing economy, create new jobs and investments, and increase economic opportunities and build capacity.”

In a phone interview with The Northern View, a special advisor for Coastal First Nations involved in the agreement process, whose traditional name is Guujaaw, said villages used to have fleets of fishing boats up until the 1970s, when new licensing rules pushed them out.

The new deal provides funding through a corporate fishery model so that the First Nations can access existing licenses and quotas as they are relinquished by retired or soon-to-be-retired fishers and operators.

The federal government said the agreement could potentially lead to an rise in average household income of almost 50 per cent, and the creation of hundreds of jobs.

The seven nations included are the Heiltsuk Nation, Kitasoo/Xai’xais First Nation, Metlakatla First Nation, Nuxalk Nation, Wuikinuxv Nation, Gitga’at First Nation and Gitxaala Nation.

READ MORE: Lax Kw’alaams, Metlakatla oppose commercial herring fishery

READ MORE: Recreational fishing for sockeye salmon in the Skeena River watershed temporarily closed


Jenna Cocullo | Journalist
Jenna Cocullo 
Send Jenna email
Like the The Northern View on Facebook
Follow us on Twitter

Just Posted

Helping with Christmas bird count is ‘citizen science’

Port Alberni’s bird count will be Dec. 28, 2019; volunteers are needed

BUDGET 2020: Port Alberni Fire Department needs new equipment

Police services ask for funding for community policing office

Child care sector feels the squeeze in Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District

There are five children for every licensed child care space in the ACRD

Alberni Valley Community Forest manager hosts open house

More trails registered in community forest

EDITORIAL: We all have a say in Port Alberni’s annual budget

The City of Port Alberni released its proposed five-year financial plan for 2020-2024…

VIDEO: Boys help rescue Cariboo bear cub

The cub, weighing just 24lbs, has been taken to wildlife sanctuary in Northwest B.C. for the winter

‘Things haven’t changed enough:’ Ecole Polytechnique anniversary prompts reflection

Fourteen women were fatally shot by a gunman at the Montreal school on Dec. 6, 1989

Bear raids freezer, gorges on Island family’s Christmas baking

Hungry bruin virtually ignored meat and fish, focused, instead, on the sweets

B.C. pharmaceutical company’s stocks double in value after successful lupus drug trial

More than 40 per cent of patients using voclosporin saw improvements in kidney function

Second warning on romaine lettuce from California region as another E. coli case reported

Two cases of E. coli have been reported in relation to the illness in the U.S.

Residents in B.C. city could face 133% tax hike in ‘worst case’ lawsuit outcome: report

An average home could see a tax increase of $2,164 in one year

B.C. Transit finds 28 used fareboxes online, saves $300,000

‘Someone joked maybe we can buy used fareboxes on eBay,’ CEO says

Many of Canada’s working poor can’t afford lawyers, don’t qualify for legal aid

One lawyer says many people earn too much to qualify for legal aid, but not enough to really live on

Economy lost 71,200 jobs in November, unemployment rate climbs to 5.9%

Jobless rate is at its highest since August 2018, when it hit 6%

Most Read