Hupacasath First Nation compensated for TFL 44 land removal

The Hupacasath has signed an agreement with the province that compensates the tribe for the removal of private land from TFL 44 in 2004.

Port Alberni’s Hupacasath First Nation has signed off on an agreement with the provincial government that compensates the tribe for the removal of private land from Tree Farm License 44.

TFL 44 lands are part of 232,000 hectares that comprise the traditional territory of the Hupacasath. The lands in question were removed in 2004.

The tribe will receive $305,000 over five years for consultation purposes.

Other provisions include an 800 hectare First Nation woodland licence at Great Central Lake, a short-term 20,000 cubic metre non-replaceable forest licence at Great Central Lake, one new woodlot tenure at Sproat Lake and an expansion of an existing Hupacasath Woodlot Licence.

The agreement will be implemented over the next three years, a press release noted.

The courts ruled in 2005 the Hupacasath weren’t accommodated by the move. The government appealed the decision and lost in 2008. Subsequent negotiations between the tribe and province took three years.

The tribe voted to accept the final agreement at a community meeting last Thursday.

The hall was packed and people applauded after. I don’t know if I’ve ever seen that before,” Hupacasath CEO Robert Duncan said.

The three-year time frame allows the province to undergo an internal process to create localized areas that require special management.

The tribe will also have time to develop a recreational and sustainable tourism opportunity at Great Central Lake, which was part of the agreement. The Hupacasath will now choose two of four lots for recreational development.

The move will impact more than 40 float homes that occupy the lake illegally. “The province has issued notice to them. They’re handling that issue,” Duncan said.

The tribe’s existing 400 hectare woodlot is being expanded; 137 hectares of reserve land is being taken out and being replaced with 500 hectares in the Beaver Creek area, Duncan said.

In November 2011, the Tseshaht First Nation was also compensated for private land taken out of TFL 44. Their First Nations woodland tenure provided 40,000 cubic metres of timber split across parcels at Cataract Lake, Sproat Lake and off Ship Creek Road near Polly’s Point over 25-years.

reporter@albernivalleynews.com

Twitter.com/AlberniNews

Watch for updates to this story at www.albernivalleynews.com

Just Posted

VIDEO: Man extracted from vehicle eight hours after accident near Cameron Lake

People making pit stop at picnic area made crash discovery

Person extracted from vehicle accident in Cameron Lake

A person has been extracted today from a reported vehicle accident in… Continue reading

Seeing double, the trials and tribulations of twins

BIG READ: Three Vancouver Island mothers share their experiences with multiple births

Learn about Port Alberni’s mayoral candidates with new film series

Alberni Valley filmmaker Dallas Dalziel discusses key issues with candidates

City of Port Alberni issues water quality alert for Kitsuksis Creek area

Kitsuksis Creek residents urged to use alternate drinking water source

CUTENESS OVERLOAD: 2 sea otters hold hands at the Vancouver Aquarium

Holding hands is a common – and adorable – way for otters to stay safe in the water

B.C. nanny charged with sex abuse of 3 children

Saanich Police seek potential victims of Johnathon Lee Robichaud from Central Saanich

‘I’m no quitter’ on climate change issues, McKenna says at G7 ministers meeting

David Suzuki says if McKenna believes what she’s saying, she too should quit

VIDEO: Inside an eerily empty mall in Canada

Only seven of 517 retail spaces are open for business as the grand opening postponed to next year

B.C. wildfires burned large areas affected by mountain pine beetles: Experts

The mountain pine beetle epidemic affected more than 180,000 square kilometres in B.C.

Tens of thousands without power following tornado in Ottawa region

Hydro Ottawa says more than 170,000 customers were without power early this morning

BALONEY METER: Do Liberal policies mean a typical family is $2,000 richer?

MPs took to Twitter to talk how ‘typical’ Canadian families have more money due to Liberal policies

B.C. premier apologizes for removal of 1950s totem pole at Canada-U.S. border

First Nations say pole was raised at Peace Arch but removed to make way for tourism centre

Tornado touches down in Ottawa and Gatineau, Que.

Environment Canada says cars and homes have been damaged by severe thunderstorms and high wind gusts

Most Read