More than 100,000 toxic toys named in Canada-wide recall

Plastic doll contains levels of phthalates over allowable limit and may pose chemical hazard

More than 100,000 Little Princess Dolls sold over the last 15 months have been recalled in a Canada-wide bid to get the toxic toys out of kids’ hands.

Health Canada issued the recall on Montoy’s Little Princess Dolls sold from Sept. 12, 2017 to Dec. 18, 2018 after they were found to contain levels of phthalates that exceed the allowable limit, thereby posing a chemical hazard.

Studies suggest that certain phthalates, including DEHP, may cause reproductive and developmental abnormalities in young children when soft vinyl products containing phthalates are sucked or chewed for extended periods.

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The product comes in six different variations – different hair and dress colours – with the same identification code. The item number 08-3066065 and UPC 667888315611 can be found on the lower back part of the packaging.

Approximately 111,378 units of the affected products were sold in Canada.

As of Dec. 21, the distributor Dollarama L.P. has not received any reports of injuries related to the use of the doll.

The recalled toys should be taken away from children and either thrown out or returned to the store for refund, no receipt required.

For more information, consumers may contact Dollarama toll free at 1-888-365-4266, 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

For further information on phthalates in children’s products, see Health Canada’s website.

ALSO READ: Pregnant Victoria woman files lawsuit after birth control recall

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