Neighbours worried about new Burde subdivision

Traffic issues and low water pressure were big concerns to Burde Street residents at a public hearing last week.

Traffic issues and low water pressure were big concerns to Burde Street residents at the public hearing last week for phase two of Bowerman Excavating’s proposal to develop Uplands subdivision.

The second phase of the Uplands subdivision is proposed to be located on Burde Street between Swordfern Lane and Carriere Road.

The first phase of the subdivision included 55 lots just to the west of the new phase.

This new phase, according to city planner Scott Smith’s report, will consist of 67 lots of varying size.

The 7.34-hectare property is currently zoned a mix of neighbourhood commercial, single family residential and one and two family residential.

“There’s a mix of both small and larger lot sizes throughout the subdivision and given that the layout may change as the engineering gets more fine-tuned, we are proposing a new zone called the comprehensive development zone,” said Smith.

“This zone has detailed regulations that would allow for a mix of lot sizes, setbacks, lot coverage and accessory uses but they are all still single family residential.”

Adding more houses to the area doesn’t sit well with all of the current residents, however.

“I would ask that you guys think about how wide the road is because when you put in the first portion of the subdivision, the road is quite narrow and I’m not sure if you guys were aware of how many cars actually park on the side of the road,” said Sabah McLellan, who lives on Burde Street just up from the proposed development. Several other residents raised similar concerns about increased traffic and congestion in the area.

“There isn’t enough room for two lanes of traffic if there are cars parked on the side of the road… and there’s a lot of cars parked there quite often, as opposed to in the driveways.”

Theo Vissia, who lives east of the proposed development had traffic concerns as well.

“My main concerns are traffic—there’s a lot of ATVs and dirt bikes and logging trucks there and people have no regard for the stop signs so its a dangerous road and now with extra housing there, which I’m not opposed to, I am concerned,” said Vissia.

He also raised concerns about his already low water pressure.

“If we put another 70 lots down there what’s going to happen to the water pressure? My water pressure at the moment is already 40 pounds,” said Vissia.

“I’ve had the city down several times and they checked it and said they won’t do anything until it gets down to 35.”

The average, Vissia added, should be 65.

“My water pressure’s so bad my granddaughter won’t have a shower at my house because she can’t wash her hair.”

Smith said that issues with water pressure would have to be resolved between the developer and the  city before work began.

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