Prime Minister Justin Trudeau gets a hug as he visits caregivers and their family members at Malvern Family Resource Centre in Toronto on March 31, 2017. (Frank Gunn/The Canadian Press)

New immigration projects offer caregivers pathway to permanent residence

Under the newly designed programs, caregivers will be given greater flexibility to change jobs quickly

The Trudeau government is launching two new immigration pilot programs that will allow caregivers to come to Canada with their families while also offering them the opportunity to become permanent residents.

Under the newly designed programs, caregivers will be given greater flexibility to change jobs quickly, if needed. Current barriers that prevent caregivers’ family members from coming with them to Canada will also be removed, and open work permits will be offered to their spouses and common-law partners as well as study permits for dependent children.

“Caregivers provide care to families in Canada that need it, and it’s time for Canada to care for them in return,” said Immigration Minister Ahmed Hussen.

“We are providing them with both the opportunity to bring their family members here and access permanent residency to demonstrate our commitment.”

Applicants will be assessed for permanent residence criteria before they begin working in Canada. Once they obtain a work permit and have two years of work experience under their belts, they will have access to a direct pathway to become a permanent resident.

These five-year pilot programs are replacing the expiring ’Caring for Children’ and ‘Caring for People with High Medical Needs’ pilot programs, which Hussen says were ineffective.

The new Home Child Care Provider pilot and the Home Support Worker pilot will begin later this year with a maximum of 2,750 principal applicants each, for a total of 5,500 principal applicants per year. Spouses, common-law partners and dependent children will not count against these limits.

READ MORE: One of B.C.’s newest citizens reflects on the value of immigration

READ MORE: Canada to increase annual immigration admissions to 350000 by 2021

For caregivers already in Canada who arrived after changes made in 2014 to the caregiver program that were not well understood, an interim Pathway for Caregivers program is also being launched.

A number of caregivers began working for families in Canada only to find out later they would not qualify for permanent residence under any existing programs. This new temporary program with modified criteria will provide those caregivers who, in good faith, came to Canada and are providing care to Canadians, a new chance to stay in Canada permanently.

This interim program will be open from March 4 to June 4, 2019.

Teresa Wright, The Canadian Press


Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Musical fundraiser in Port Alberni supports life after loss

Camp Kerry Society raising funds to provide grief and loss supports to children and youth

No ‘imminent’ health risks at McLean Mill, says medical health officer

Remediation costs for historic site raises concerns

Port Alberni resident assaulted after confronting thief

RCMP warn residents to call for police assistance

Butterflies released in Port Alberni in memory of loved ones

Alberni Valley Hospice Society hosts fourth annual ‘Butterfly Effect’

Overpass, barrier, more parking considered for Cathedral Grove

Provincial government proceeding ‘with caution’

VIDEO: Killer whale steals fisherman’s catch off North Coast

Fishing duel results in eager orca snagging salmon in Prince Rupert

Fate of accused in Canadian couple’s 1987 killings in jury’s hands

William Talbott’s lawyer says DNA doesn’t prove murder

PHOTOS: North Island home gutted in fire deemed ‘suspicious’

No injuries reported; firefighters prevented blaze from spreading

Child killed after being hit in driveway on Vancouver Island

The driver of the vehicle remained at the crash scene and is fully cooperating

Eating sandwiches, putting on makeup behind the wheel could land you a fine

RCMP say if you cause an accident while eating you could be penalized

Cat badly hurt in animal trap was likely stuck for days, B.C. owner says

Blu, a three-year-old house cat, suffered severe damage to his hind leg after being stuck in trap for days

Island Health issues safer drug-use tips ahead of music festival season

Health authority aims to reduce overdose risks at festivals

40 cats surrendered in apparent hoarding at B.C. home

Officers found the cats living among piles of garbage and feces, suffering from fleas

Most Read