Precious puppies to be named by you

The RCMP is asking kids from around the country to help name the latest police dogs

  • Jan. 31, 2018 12:36 p.m.

Next month will mark the most adorable time of the year, and it’s not because of Valentine’s Day.

The RCMP are once again asking Canadian children to choose names for 13 German Shepherd puppies that will be born throughout the year at the RCMP Police Dog Service Training Centre (PDSTC) in Innisfail, Alberta.

RELATED: Name those puppies

In order to win a chance to name a dog, kids must be original and imaginative as these names will serve the puppies during their police dog careers.

The 13 children whose puppy names will be selected will each receive a laminated photo of the puppy they named, a plush dog called Justice and an official RCMP baseball cap.

The rules of the contest are simple:

  • puppy names must begin with the letter “L” and have no more than two syllables and nine letters,
  • contestants must live in Canada and be 14 years old or younger,
  • only one entry per child must be sent,
  • entries must be sent no later than February 28, 2018.

Fill out the online form by clicking here.

Or mail your puppy name, own name, age, complete address and telephone number to:

2018 Name the Puppy Contest

RCMP Police Dog Service Training Centre

P.O. Box 6120

Innisfail, AB T4G 1S8

Winning names will be chosen by the entire PDSTC staff. In the event of multiple submissions of the same puppy name, a draw will determine the winning entry. There will be one winner from each province and territory.

Contest winners will be announced on April 10.

Non-winning puppy names will be considered for other puppies born during the year.

So be creative and remember drawings or paintings are welcome.

Check out this video of the latest police recruit.

The PDSTC is home to the RCMP’s national police dog training program. The Centre has earned a great reputation for breeding top quality working German shepherds and for training dogs with outstanding searching and tracking abilities.

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