Private regulations issue in Alberni’s watershed: Bell

Bell was presenting his report titled ‘Forest Harvesting and Water Quality: A Case Study of the China Creek Community Watershed.'

The difference between how privately owned and Crown land is managed continues to be a problem for Port Alberni’s China Creek watershed, according to  Patrick Bell, a Masters of Art in Planning candidate at UBC. Bell was presenting his report titled ‘Forest Harvesting and Water Quality: A Case Study of the China Creek Community Watershed’ on behalf of the Watershed Forest Alliance, a group that has been advocating for more cautious watershed management and less disruptive logging for years.

“Logging usually requires the construction and use of roads, which are the dominant source of sediment in most parts of the watershed,” said Bell.

“Harvesting trees can also increase turbidity as it can alter the absorption and movement of water and cause soil to become unstable, resulting in erosion and landslides.”

The erosion and increased sediment in the water can increase its turbidity (a measure of solid particles suspended in water).

“Turbidity itself doesn’t actually cause health problems but it can interfere with the disinfection process,” said Bell.

“The provincial 4-3-2-1-0 drinking water objective sets the conditions that must be met in order to receive a filtration deferral, which Port Alberni has. If turbidity becomes elevated, this deferral may no longer be possible.”

While Crown land has strict regulations regarding logging practices, private land (93 per cent of the China Creek watershed is owned by Island Timberlands and TimberWest) doesn’t have the same standards, Bell said.

“Private regulations are perceived as being less rigorous, with less transparency and public oversight than Crown regulations,” said Bell.

“The most significant differences between the Crown and private [forest management] acts is the requirement on Crown lands to present a publicly accessible forest stewardship plan to the province for approval before any logging is done.”

Council forwarded Bell’s report to their watershed committee.

reporter@albernivalleynews.com

facebook.com/albernivalleynews

twitter.com/alberninews

 

Just Posted

Accident causes power outage on Beaver Creek Road

One sent to West Coast General Hospital in crash

West Coast Hockey Prep Camp draws nearly 1,000 players to Port Alberni

History-making Korean hockey coach joins league of celebrity instructors

Port Alberni co-ops targeted in different crimes

One break-and-enter, one case of graffiti at each gas station

Offroad racing happening at Alberni Motorsports Park July 21–22

Last mud truck event until September on the Port Alberni track

Lease agreement signed for Port Alberni oil spill response base

25-year lease agreement is part of a larger expansion plan

Here’s what you need to know about Day 1 at the BC Games

All 18 events kick off on the track, riding ring, fields, courts and lake in the Cowichan Valley

VIDEO: How to throw a frisbee

Ultimate frisbee player Amy Mackay shows off the proper technique

Site C dam project plagued by problems: expert

E. Harvey Elwin expresses concern about internal BC Hydro and government documents

Seal attacks kayakers in the Broughton Archipelago

“It has to be one chance in a million of this happening.”

Victoria-area park sign removed after glitch redirects to porn site

Resident looking to learn more about workout equipment discovered the problem code

Special Olympic athletes take on BC Games during special anniversary

Known as the Global Day of Inclusion, July 20 marks the first Special Olympics in 1968 in Chicago

Scammers dressed as Mounties threaten to arrest senior if she doesn’t cough up cash

Pair of fraudulent officers threaten to arrest 90-year-old woman

Fundraiser to help mom of jogger detained after crossing U.S. border

Cedella Roman, 19, was held in U.S. after accidentally crossing border in South Surrey

Okanagan Wildfires: The latest on wildfires and evacuations

A Friday morning look at the major wildfires impact the Okanagan and Similkameen.

Most Read