Archeologist Kira Kristensen

Archeologist Kira Kristensen

Stirling Field archeological survey begins

The Stirling Field development into a car dealership has taken step forward with an archeological impact assessment of the site this week.

The development of Stirling Field into a car dealership has taken another step forward.

Officials conducted an archeological impact assessment of the site this week.

The process was requested by Hupacasath Chief Councillor Stephen Tatoosh at a city council meeting last April when councillors approved Van Isle Ford’s application to relocate to Stirling Field.

The archeological work is being done under a provincial permit. The city contracted Madrone Environmental Services to do the work. The archeologist on site is Kira Kristensen.

The work is expected to be finished this week with a report to be assembled and submitted to city council as well as the Hupacasath and Tseshaht First Nations.

According to the Ministry of Forests and Lands website, archeological impact assessments are required where potential conflicts have been identified between archeological resources and a proposed development.

Sites are located and recorded, and site significance is evaluated to assess the nature and extent of expected impacts. The assessment includes recommendations to manage the impact of property development on the site.

Tatoosh made the request because Stirling Field is located adjacent to Hupacasath lands. The area is in a flood plain and may not have been occupied before contact. But a river channel used to run through the area and Hupacasath peoples likely travelled through there, Tatoosh said.

Hupacasath and Tseshaht representatives have been at the site observing the work, Tatoosh said.

reporter@albernivalleynews.com