Mike Anderson was walking home on Sparks Street near Davis Avenue on Nov. 15 when he was sprayed in the face with an unknown substance. (Brittany Gervais/Terrace Standard)

Mike Anderson was walking home on Sparks Street near Davis Avenue on Nov. 15 when he was sprayed in the face with an unknown substance. (Brittany Gervais/Terrace Standard)

Terrace man with neurological medical conditions burned in acid attack

RCMP looking for information on two suspected men

A Terrace man is recovering from chemical burns on his face after being attacked with suspected battery acid and police say that the two culprits remain at large.

Mike Anderson, 51, was walking home after attending the Philanthropy Day event at the Terrace Art Gallery on Sparks Street near Davis Avenue at 8 p.m. on Nov. 15 when he was approached by two men, according to RCMP.

One of them asked Anderson, who is legally blind, for the time. But when Anderson brought his wristwatch up close to his face, the two men sprayed him directly in the face with an acidic substance, which he says he believes might be car battery acid.

“I felt my face get wet, and then…I thought they were going to hit me, so I covered myself up. But my eyes were burning,” an emotional Anderson told the Terrace Standard on Monday.

Unable to see as the chemical singed his eyes and blistered his face, all he could hear was the uproarious laughter from his attackers. Then he heard a women’s voice, asking them to leave.

Soon after, they were gone.

READ MORE: Terrace man recovering from machete attack

“I could open one of my eyes, it would sting and kept closing, but I found a puddle so I could wash my face. I tried to use my phone but it was slippery, and it wouldn’t unlock,” Anderson says. “But I was close to home.”

In a news release after the incident, RCMP described the two suspects as Indigenous and in their 20s. One had a small beard, the other was wearing a hoodie.

‘I just hoped I could see again’

For Anderson, who was diagnosed this year with a complex neurological condition, walking the two blocks from the art gallery to his home is more difficult than for most people.

In August, Anderson suffered two herniated discs in his spine and was flown to Vancouver General Hospital for two weeks for doctors to administer a nerve block, a method of producing anesthesia.

Then a month later in September, he was walking over to a follow-up appointment for his back, he started to feel unwell. Fearing something was wrong, Anderson went to the hospital, where he lost feeling on his left side. He was sent back to VGH right away.

Doctors diagnosed Anderson with conversion disorder, a neurological condition that mimics the symptoms of a stroke. Rather than damage the actual structure of the brain, the disorder impacts a person’s ability to do certain things, resulting in conditions including blindness, paralysis and speech problems.

“They didn’t know why it was happening,” he says. “Then they eliminated stroke and said it was neurological, but no clots, bleeding or tumours, so that’s good news but it will still take time to retrain my brain.”

After the attack, the only way Anderson was able to tell how close he was from home was because he could smell the gas coming from a sewer lift station, a concrete sewer basin in the ground, and knew his street was the next one over.

He was able to get home, struggled with the security keypad on his front door, and washed his face in the sink. He called his son on his landline, who then came home and took him to the hospital. Hospital staff could still smell the chemical on his clothes when he was admitted, he says.

“It smelled like sulfur, like rotten eggs. RCMP aren’t sure what it was, but hospital staff think it was maybe car battery acid.”

It took six hours to completely flush the substance out of his eyes and lungs, he says. Hospital staff treated the painful blisters on Anderson’s face with a cream.

Although he’s trying to recover, the fear of being attacked while walking around Terrace has stayed with him.

“I was scared. I didn’t know where they were, and my eyes are bad because of other conditions. I just hoped… I hoped I could see again,” he says.

Anderson has been to a few eye appointments since the attack, and was told while his eyes are still irritated, no permanent damage was done to his already limited vision.

READ MORE: Terrace ranks in top 10 of magazine’s ‘Canada’s Most Dangerous Places’ list

Community support ‘overwhelming,’ says Anderson

After being diagnosed, Anderson’s family started a GoFundMe page and have since started it back up again after he was attacked. So far, they’ve raised $7,010 out of their $8,000 goal to pay for Anderson’s medical expenses.

The community support to help him and his family has been “overwhelming,” Anderson says.

Karleen Lemiski contacted the Helping Hands of Terrace about Anderson’s story, and the organization jumped on board to cover any of his prescription costs, along with a monetary donation. The Terrace Royal Canadian Legion Branch 13 also contacted Anderson to see if they could help with any mobility items, such as a wheelchair, a walker, which can be used to help a person with mobility issues get around, and grab-bars.

The Kimmunity Angels Society was also contacted, and they are looking into whether they can reimburse Anderson’s September medical flight back from VGH, his new glasses or other medical expenses.

MaXXed Out Cross Training’s Denise Manion has also set up a fundraiser for a heavyweight sled pull competition scheduled for Nov. 28 to Dec. 6 to help the Anderson family.

Police are asking anyone who may have seen anything or know anything about this incident to contact investigators at 250-638-7429.


 


brittany@terracestandard.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

Alberni Valley Bulldogs’ goalie Luke Pearson stopped all 22 shots the Cowichan Capitals sent his way to collect a 5–0 shutout in B.C. Hockey League action, Saturday, April 10, 2021. (SUSAN QUINN/ Alberni Valley News)
BCHL: Pearson earns shutout in Bulldogs’ win over Cowichan Capitals

Alberni Valley will face Victoria Grizzlies Sunday, April 11 at 3 p.m.

A 3.0-magnitude earthquake occurred off Ucluelet just after 12:30 a.m. on April 10 and was reportedly felt as far south as Oregon. (Map via United States Geological Survey)
Quake off Ucluelet reportedly felt as far south as Oregon

Magnitude 1.5 earthquake also reported off Vancouver Island’s west coast hours earlier

Princess Elizabeth and her new husband, Prince Philip—behind the wheel—visited the Alberni Valley on the princess's inaugural visit to Canada. A photographer with Charnell Studios in Port Alberni captured the young newlyweds along the parade route on Oct. 25, 1951, months before Princess Elizabeth became Queen. Prince Philip died April 9, 2021, just shy of his 100th birthday. This photo is one of 24,000 in the Alberni Valley Museum's online archives, available for public viewing at https://portalberni.pastperfectonline.com. (PHOTO PN 13605 COURTESY OF ALBERNI VALLEY MUSEUM)
LOOK BACK: Prince Philip and his new bride visit Port Alberni

A special look back with the Alberni Valley Museum to honour the life of Prince Philip

John Ambrose Seward, 33, is described as Indigenous and five-foot-eight with short black hair and brown eyes. (Police handout)
John Ambrose Seward, 33, is described as Indigenous and five-foot-eight with short black hair and brown eyes. (Police handout)
High-risk sex offender banned from central Island, living in Vancouver: police

John Ambrose Seward, 33, has been released from prison under a number of conditions

Third-generation residential school survivor, poet and attorney Francine Merasty will be a featured author at Electric Mermaid Live Reads on April 16. (SUBMITTED PHOTO)
Residential school survivor and poet to read at Electric Mermaid

Electric Mermaid: Live Reads takes place online via Zoom on Friday, April 16 at 5:45 p.m.

B.C. Health Minister Adrian Dix and Premier John Horgan describe vaccine rollout at the legislature, March 29, 2021. (B.C. government)
1,262 more COVID-19 infections in B.C. Friday, 9,574 active cases

Province’s mass vaccination reaches one million people

Two-year-old Ivy McLeod, seen here on April 9, 2021 with four-year-old sister Elena and mom Vanessa, was born with limb differences. The family, including husband/dad Sean McLeod, is looking for a family puppy that also has a limb difference. (Jenna Hauck/ Chilliwack Progress)
B.C. family looking for puppy with limb difference, just like 2-year-old Ivy

Ivy McLeod born as bilateral amputee, now her family wants to find ‘companion’ puppy for her

A vehicle that was driven through the wall of a parkade at Uptown Shopping Centre and into the nearby Walmart on April 9 was removed through another hole in the wall later that night. (Photo via Saanich Police Department and Ayush Kakkar)
Vehicle launched into B.C. Walmart removed following rescue of trapped workers

Crews cut new hole in parkade wall to remove vehicle safely

Four members with Divers for Cleaner Lakes and Oceans were out at Cultus Lake on March 28 and 29 hauling trash out of the waters. (Henry Wang)
PHOTOS: Out-of-town divers remove 100s of pounds of trash from Cultus Lake

Members of Divers for Cleaner Lakes and Oceans hauled out 470 pounds of trash over two days

As of Saturday, April 10, people born in 1961 are the latest to be eligible for a COVID-19 vaccine. (Black Press files)
B.C. residents age 60+ can now register to get their COVID-19 vaccine

Vaccine registration is now open to people born in 1961 or earlier

A new saline gargle test, made in B.C., will soon be replacing COVID-19 nasal swab tests for kids. (PHSA screenshot)
Take-home COVID-19 tests available for some B.C. students who fall ill at school

BC Children’s Hospital plans to provide 1,200 kits to Vancouver district schools this April

Ruming Jiang and his dog Chiu Chiu are doing fine following a brush with hypothermia that saw several people work together to get them out of the Fraser River near Langley’s Derby Reach Park on March 25, 2021 (Special to the Advance Times)
Man finds men who rescued him from drowning in B.C.’s Fraser River

A grateful Ruming Jiang says he will thank them again, this time in person when the pandemic ends

The 10-part Netflix series Maid, which is being exclusively shot in Greater Victoria, was filming near Prospect Lake in Saanich last month. (Photo courtesy Fred Haynes)
Province announces $150,000 towards South Island film studio, fulfilling B.C. NDP promise

Investment to fund movie studio feasibility study at Camosun College

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Most Read