Tseshaht canoe returns to ocean

Dee Bryson's Tseshaht canoe is returning to the Alberni Inlet.

Dee Bryson of Tsawaayuus (Rainbow Gardens) displays a print of the Tseshaht canoe that she donated to the Port Alberni Maritime Heritage Society.

Dee Bryson’s canoe has sat at her home on Lakeshore Road for almost six decades.

But finally, the Tseshaht canoe is coming back to the ocean waters where it started out.

“For the past 57–58 years the canoe has been on Dee’s property at Sproat Lake,” said Port Alberni Maritime Heritage Society president Kenn Whiteman.

“Prior to that, it was believed to be situated on the Alberni Inlet around Polly’s point.”

Bryson’s canoe was donated to the PAMHS with the aid of Bob Cole and Bryson’s daughters Nancy Harvey and Joanne Ross. Bryson, in her 90s, now lives at Tsawaayuus (Rainbow Gardens) complex care facility.

Harvey said that the canoe had been stored in a shed all those years.

“It was there at their summer cabin that they bought in the 1950s so it’s been there on that property 60 years.”

According to art consultant Kerry Mason, who appraised the canoe, it’s a hand carved cedar canoe.

“This is a rare example of the early 20th century west coast canoe style used by women to collect eel  and bear grasses and other indigenous fibres for the creation of basketry,” Mason wrote.

“The west coast style of canoe was relatively light to manoeuver and bring to shore and yet it was remarkably stable. Referred to as a dugout, it is literally a hollowed out cedar log.”

The lightweight manoeuvrability of the 15-foot-6-inch long canoe meant it was often referred to as a woman’s canoe.

“This is often referred to as a woman’s canoe,” said Mason.

“As opposed to the larger, higher and thicker canoe with a narrow bottom and high sides which is perfectly designed for use in the ocean, particularly for whaling, which historically was strictly a man’s prerogative.”

The Tseshaht canoe will be on display at the Hutcheson Gallery as part of their Ch’apats (canoe) maritime heritage night on Thursday, Feb. 18 at 7 p.m. Darrell Ross Sr. will be presenting on six different kinds of Tseshaht canoes.

reporter@albernivalleynews.com

facebook.com/albernivalleynews

twitter.com/alberninews

 

Just Posted

North Island College entices international students to Alberni’s ECCE program

Port Alberni had seven international students in January 2019

Port Alberni’s bylaw department shifts from reactive to proactive

8.5 times more files being completed by bylaw officers

Port Alberni’s West Coast Rangers hold rendezvous

Three-day event featured historical re-enactment

Port Alberni Port Authority talks logistics for cruise ship visit

Some restrictions for pedestrians, boaters will be in place

Port Alberni’s ‘Army of Problem Solvers’ to the rescue

Facebook group gathers people who just want to help their neighbours

VIDEO: Canadian breaks women’s world record for longest plank

Dana Glowacka, of Montreal, held a plank for four hours and 20 minutes

‘I think he’s still alive’: B.C. mom pleads for help finding son last seen a month ago

Family offering $5,000 reward for information leading to the safe return of Tim Delahaye

New poll suggests one-third don’t want politicians to wear religious symbols

Local politicians shouldn’t be allowed to wear hijabs, crucifixes or turbans on the job, survey suggests

Raptors fans far from home adjust plans to watch pivotal playoff game

Raptors currently lead the playoff series 3-2, and a win Saturday would vault them into NBA finals

PHOTOS: First responders in Fernie rescue baby owl who fell from nest

The baby owl’s inability to fly back to its nest prompted a rescue by first responders

Five takeaways from the Court of Appeal ruling on B.C.’s pipeline law

It’s unclear how many tools are left in B.C.’s toolbox to fight the project

Pacific Rim National Park Reserve investigating after sea lion found shot in the head

Animal is believed to have been killed somewhere between Ucluelet and Tofino

B.C. port workers set to strike on Monday in Vancouver

A strike at two container terminals would affect Canadian trade to Asia

Most Read