As his mother Wenyi Zhang holds him, one-year-old Abel Zhang looks at the book being given him by Dr. Lauren Lawler, right, as his grandmother Ding Hong helps with his clothes moments after the child received the last of three inoculations, including a vaccine for measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR) (AP Photo/Elaine Thompson)

Washington lawmakers advance limits on vaccine exemptions

Legislation comes amid an outbreak that has sickened more than 50 people in the Pacific Northwest

Washington state lawmakers advanced a measure Friday that would remove parents’ ability to claim a personal or philosophical exemption to vaccinating their school-age children for measles as the Pacific Northwest struggles with an outbreak of the contagious virus.

The House Health Care and Wellness Committee approved House Bill 1638 on a 10-5 vote. The full House could vote on it in the coming weeks.

The legislation comes amid an outbreak that has sickened more than 50 people in the Pacific Northwest and led Washington Gov. Jay Inslee to declare a state of emergency. Health officials have reported at least 54 known cases in Washington state and four in Oregon.

Washington is among 17 states, including Oregon, that allow some type of non-medical vaccine exemption for “personal, moral or other beliefs,” according to the National Conference of State Legislatures.

READ MORE: Third measles case in Vancouver prompts letter to parents

Washington now allows vaccination exemptions for children at public or private schools or licensed day-care centres based on medical, religious and personal or philosophical beliefs. Unless an exemption is claimed, a child is required to be vaccinated against or show proof of acquired immunity for nearly a dozen diseases — including polio, whooping cough and mumps — before they can attend school or a child care centre.

Hundreds of people who oppose ending the exemptions, including environmental activist Robert F. Kennedy Jr., showed up at a public hearing on the legislation last week.

A broader measure introduced in the state Senate, which would not allow personal or philosophical exemptions to be granted for any required school vaccinations, is scheduled for a public hearing next Wednesday.

Four per cent of Washington secondary school students have non-medical vaccine exemptions, the state Department of Health said. Of those, 3.7 per cent of the exemptions are personal, and the rest are religious.

In Clark County — an area just north of Portland, Oregon, where all but one of the Washington cases are concentrated — 6.7 per cent of kindergartners had a non-medical exemption for the 2017-18 school year, health officials said.

READ MORE: Measles outbreak in Washington state spurs warning from BC Centre for Disease Control

California removed personal belief vaccine exemptions for children in both public and private schools in 2015 after a measles outbreak at Disneyland sickened 147 people and spread across the U.S. and into Canada. Vermont also abandoned its personal exemption in 2015.

Rachel La Corte, The Associated Press

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

BC SPCA seeks help for German shepherd puppies abandoned near Port Alberni

Donations have ‘petered out’ as doors are closed due to COVID-19

Funtastic music festival and slo-pitch cancelled for 2020

Annual Canada Day event cancelled due to COVID-19

Port Alberni family thanks long-term care workers with face shield donation

Matriarch received ‘excellent care’ at seniors’ facility before her death in 2018

PAC RIM ACTIVE: Time for a nature club in Port Alberni

Nature clubs provide education, spearhead conservation projects in their communities

Timeline pushed back for Tofino-Ucluelet highway construction project

Ucluelet mayor Mayco Noel said the ministry’s announcement came as “no surprise.”

COVID-19 death toll reaches 50 in B.C., while daily case count steadies

B.C. records 34 new cases in the province, bringing total active confirmed cases to 462

An ongoing updated list of Alberni Valley events affected by COVID-19

Has your event been cancelled or postponed? Check here

B.C. unveils $5M for mental health supports during the COVID-19 pandemic

Will include virtual clinics and resources for British Columbians, including front-line workers

VIDEO: Community rallies around Campbell River fire victims

Emergency Social Services volunteers logged over 100 hours in first day after fire

B.C.’s COVID-19 rent supplement starts taking applications

$300 to $500 to landlords for April, May and June if eligible

Reality TV show about bodybuilders still filming in Okanagan, amid COVID-19

Five bodybuilders from across the country flew to Kelowna to move into a house for a reality TV show

B.C.’s top doctor details prescription for safe long weekend

Yes, it includes hosting an online cooking show

Most Read