Wood stoves exchangeable for rebate

The annual program provides a $250 rebate when a new wood-burning, pellet or natural gas stove is purchased to replace an older model.

The Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District (ACRD) is offering a $250 rebate to people who choose to exchange their old wood stoves for new ones.

The province, in partnership with the BC Lung Association, has provided $15,600 to the ACRD as part of the Provincial Wood Stove Exchange Program.

The annual program provides a $250 rebate when a new wood-burning, pellet or natural gas stove is purchased to replace an older model.

“It’s a program that was put on by the Ministry of Environment a few years ago but now it has been taken over by the BC Lung Association,” said Andrew McGifford, manager of environmental services at the ACRD. “We’ve been provided a grant and 44 wood stoves that are available for the $250 rebate.”

McGifford said qualified wood stove retailers have signed up for the program with the ACRD who will provide a $150 rebate to the consumer in addition to the $250.

“We have a brochure that lays out what is required and [consumers] can go to one of the retailers that are in the program and they will basically reserve a rebate,” McGifford said.

Old wood stoves have to then be taken to the landfill for proper disposal.

According to a press release from the Ministry of Environment, new emissions-certified wood stoves burn one-third less wood and reduce smoke and particulates entering the atmosphere by 70 per cent or more.

“If we have an efficient stove that doesn’t provide the harmful emissions, it improves the air quality overall for the community,” McGifford said.

Since 2008, communities have received almost $2.7 million in provincial funding and more than 7,000 wood-burning stoves and inserts have been replaced by newer, cleaner burning models, according to the press release.

“Our successful wood stove exchange program encourages homeowners toreduce emissions by at least 70 percent by swapping out outdated, inefficient stoves and replacing them with new, high-efficiency ones,” Mary Polak, minister of environment, states in the press release.

“By upgrading these appliances and making a concerted effort to burn smarter, British Columbians are proactively improving their personal health while improving air quality in their communities.”

The newer wood stoves have helped in the reduction of approximately 500 tonnes of particulate matter emissions entering the air each year.

 

karly.blats@albernivalleynews.com

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