B.C. or U.S. Liberal Party? It’s hard to tell

To the Editor,
With an unblinking eye on my television set, where Al Jazeera documented a deposed octogenarian despot scurrying across Egypt to his Red Sea hideaway to begin counting his billions, I listened to the BC Liberal leadership debate on CKNW radio.

To the Editor,With an unblinking eye on my television set, where Al Jazeera documented a deposed octogenarian despot scurrying across Egypt to his Red Sea hideaway to begin counting his billions, I listened to the BC Liberal leadership debate on CKNW radio. If there was ever any doubt of our politicians taking their cue from counterparts south of the 49th parallel, that doubt was quickly erased as Bill Good moderated this meeting of the “Six Pack”.Christy Clark, the media-darling and supposed front-runner, wasted so much time trying to garner sympathy by claiming to be a victim of George Abbott’s negative campaigning.She sounded whiny and shrill—not unlike Sarah Palin—but really excelled when the host asked if her close affiliation with the Federal Liberal Party would be an impediment with conservative-leaning voters in B.C. She immediately shot back with “I’ve not been a member of the Federal Liberal Party in 15 years, Bill”.The host, her co-worker until a couple months ago, didn’t press the point; though I’m sure everybody in the listening audience remembered her prominence in federal campaigns of Stephane Dion in 2007, and Paul Martin in 2006. Very Clinton-esque.Way at the other end of the popularity spectrum we heard Ed Mayne stating “When entering this race I decided not to go negative, and also promised to make no promises”. That had such a Rumsfeldian tone,  very similar his infamous “Known unknowns” speech. Yet when asked for closing remarks he completely reversed himself,  in style worthy of George W. Bush, with “I promise to…I promise to… I promise to…” No doubt about it, the Americanization of B.C. politics is alive and well in our provincial Liberal Party.Bernie Smith,Parksville