Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry and Dr. Evan Wood from the B.C. Centre for Substance Abuse discuss solutions to overdose deaths in the province, B.C. legislature, Feb. 7, 2019. (Tom Fletcher/Black Press)

Provincial Health Officer Dr. Bonnie Henry and Dr. Evan Wood from the B.C. Centre for Substance Abuse discuss solutions to overdose deaths in the province, B.C. legislature, Feb. 7, 2019. (Tom Fletcher/Black Press)

B.C. VIEWS: Time to listen to the doctors and legalize opioid drugs

Answer is the same as marijuana, get the criminal gangs out

As the B.C. Coroners Service released its 2018 overdose-related death totals, showing four people a day are still dying from mainly fentanyl-contaminated street drugs, there was a desperate edge to the message.

Dr. Bonnie Henry, the provincial health officer, pleaded with politicians to take action beyond handing out overdose kits and declaring emergencies. In short, prohibition is pushing users onto the street, and the flow of smuggled fentanyl, mainly from China, hasn’t slowed despite frantic efforts to harden North America’s borders to it.

The grim update was provided by B.C. Chief Coroner Lisa Lapointe, Henry and Dr. Evan Wood, executive director of the B.C. Centre for Substance Use. People who follow this story will know that paramedics, nurses and doctors are run ragged, mostly reviving hardcore street users with Naloxone injections, sometimes multiple times in the same day.

READ MORE: Almost 1,500 B.C. deaths in 2018 overdose-related

READ MORE: Mothers of those who died call for action in B.C.

Meanwhile, people continue to die at home, alone. The vast majority are men between the ages of 30 and 59. They’re not classic junkies, and as a member of that demographic I would suggest that most of them hold down jobs rather than descending to stealing or selling their bodies to get the next fix.

Wood reluctantly calls them “weekend warriors.” Another interesting stat is that the majority of them are buying stimulants, mostly cocaine or methamphetamine, that turns out to be contaminated with fentanyl. More on that in a minute.

The message to politicians was clear. Henry noted that federal law criminalizing narcotic possession is the main obstacle to progress, and that prescription substitutes such as diacetylmorphine have shown significant results in the limited tests Ottawa has allowed.

“That’s what my office is working on … how we can have de facto decriminalization of people who use drugs in B.C., recognizing that is one of the huge challenges that is leading to people using street drugs and dying, and using alone,” Henry said.

Wood said public education is needed “so the winds start to blow in a direction where the politicians see where they can really act freely and start applying some of the public health models.”

Henry said B.C. is studying Portugal’s prescription model, which is held up as an international success. In 2001, drug laws there were amended to keep hard drugs illegal, except for authorized personal use. Anyone caught with up to 10 days’ unauthorized supply is subject to an administrative penalty rather than facing jail time for possession of heroin, cocaine or the synthetic variants now cranked out by organized crime.

Coroner Lapointe referred to a survey of B.C. users that found almost half claimed they were looking for pain relief. Given the option of “pain-related,” that’s what they told surveyors.

“Pain-related wasn’t defined,” Lapointe said. “Was that physical pain, was that emotional pain, was that psychological pain? But people are reaching out for help.”

This is where I beg to differ with the soothing message of the medical establishment. People aren’t scoring tainted coke or meth because their knees are sore, or their divorce was unpleasant. They’re doing it because decades of popular culture have taught them that getting high and partying are the main reasons to go to work.

Prohibition didn’t work for booze, it didn’t work for marijuana, and it won’t work for “ecstasy” or heroin either. Fentanyl, a needed painkiller for people dealing with cancer or major surgery, might just open the eyes of timid politicians to the need to act.

Tom Fletcher is B.C. legislature reporter and columnist for Black Press Media. Email: tfletcher@blackpress.ca


@tomfletcherbc
tfletcher@blackpress.ca

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

BC legislatureopioids

Get local stories you won't find anywhere else right to your inbox.
Sign up here

Just Posted

The Alberni Valley Non-Contact Hockey League has suspended play under provincial health orders despite having a strict COVID-19 safety plan. (FILE PHOTO COURTESY TREVOR ZADO)
Adult sports shutdown ‘tough pill to swallow’ says Alberni hockey league president

Hockey, curling suspend play under new provincial COVID-19 orders

Renovations are complete at the Bread of Life and following a final health inspection, the warming centre at the Third Avenue facility will be open a few days a week. (PHOTO COURTESY BREAD OF LIFE SOCIETY)
Port Alberni’s warming centre close to opening

Organizers aim for Dec. 4 pending final health inspection

”Once upon a time…” (METRO CREATIVE)
QUINN’S QUIPS: Who is the creature in the shiny red mask?

Annual Alberni Valley News story contest kicks off for 2020

FILLING THE KETTLES
Hayden Henschel, 3, has fun slipping coins into a Salvation Army kettle on Wednesday, Nov. 25 in front of Walmart. Henschel was shopping with her family when they stopped to make a donation to the kettle campaign. To donate online, visit the website www.fillthekettle.com. (SONJA DRINKWATER/ Special to the AV News)
Port Alberni Salvation Army’s kettle campaign seeks donations

Contact-less donations are available online

‘TIS THE SEASON
Wade Addy from Addy Power Ltd. in Errington hangs Christmas lights across the bottom of Johnston Road in Port Alberni on a stormy Tuesday, Nov. 24, 2020. (SUSAN QUINN/ Alberni Valley News)
Port Alberni readies for holiday with festive street lights

Christmas lights have been going up all around town

Pickleball game in Vancouver on Sunday, November 8, 2020. B.C.’s public health restrictions for COVID-19 have been extended to adult team sports, indoors and outside. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Darryl Dyck
711 more COVID-19 cases detected in B.C. Friday

‘Virus is not letting up and neither can we’

Demonstrators, organized by the Public Fishery Alliance, outside the downtown Vancouver offices of Fisheries and Oceans Canada July 6 demand the marking of all hatchery chinook to allow for a sustainable public fishery while wild stocks recover. (Public Fishery Alliance Facebook photo)
Angry B.C. anglers see petition tabled in House of Commons

Salmon fishers demand better access to the healthy stocks in the public fishery

(Hotel Zed/Flytographer)
B.C. hotel grants couple 18 years of free stays after making baby on Valentines Day

Hotel Zed has announced a Kelowna couple has received free Valentines Day stays for next 18 years

Farmers raise slogans during a protest on a highway at the Delhi-Haryana state border, India, Thursday, Dec. 3, 2020. Prime Minister Justin Trudeau rejected the diplomatic scolding Canada’s envoy to India received on Friday for his recent comments in support of protesting Indian farmers. Tens of thousands of farmers have descended upon the borders of New Delhi to protest new farming laws that they say will open them to corporate exploitation. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Manish Swarup
Trudeau brushes off India’s criticism for standing with farmers in anti-Modi protests

The High Commission of India in Ottawa had no comment when contacted Friday

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Nurse Kath Olmstead prepares a shot as the world’s biggest study of a possible COVID-19 vaccine, developed by the National Institutes of Health and Moderna Inc., gets underway Monday, July 27, 2020, in Binghamton, N.Y. U.S. biotech firm Moderna says its vaccine is showing signs of producing lasting immunity to COVID-19, and that it will have as many as many as 125 million doses available by the end of March. THE CANADIAN PRESS/AP-Hans Pennink
Canada orders more COVID vaccines, refines advice on first doses as cases reach 400K

Canada recorded its 300,000th case of COVID-19 on Nov. 16

Apartments are seen lit up in downtown Vancouver as people are encouraged to stay home during the global COVID-19 pandemic on Thursday, Dec. 3, 2020. British Columbia’s deputy provincial health officer says provincewide data show the most important area B.C. must tackle in its response to the COVID-19 pandemic is health inequity. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Marissa Tiel
Age, income among top factors affecting well-being during pandemic, B.C. survey shows

Among respondents earning $20,000 a year or less, more than 41 per cent reported concern about food insecurity

Victoria-based driving instructors are concerned for their own and the community’s safety with the continued number of residents from COVID hotspots in the Lower Mainland coming to the city to take their driving road tests. (Black Press Media file photo)
Students from COVID hotspots travel to Vancouver Island for driving tests

Union leader calls on government to institute stronger travel ban

The opening day on Mount Washington this year was Dec. 4. Screenshot
Mount Washington opens on time, COVID-19 protocols in place

“We’re super excited - it’s been six months in the planning.”

Most Read