Editorial ‘myth’ perpetuated

To the Editor,

Re: Here’s to less toxic environs, editorial, May 20.

There’s nothing cosmetic about pesticides that are used on lawns and gardens as tools designed to address specific pest problems infesting valuable landscapes.

Unfortunately, a recent editorial portrayed common misconceptions about these products that should be addressed.

Pesticides help control threats to human health (such as rats and mosquitoes), they protect private and public properties from insect, weed and disease infestations and they help ensure that Canadians have a safe and affordable supply of food, thereby contributing to healthier communities and greater well-being and prosperity.

Furthermore, only a handful of provinces have instituted unscientific, arbitrary bans and the negative consequences are starting to show. These include illegal pesticide use, loss of green space, increased municipal maintenance costs, and homeowner frustration.

When it comes to health and safety, readers should know that before any pesticide can be sold in Canada it must undergo a rigorous scientific review and risk assessment by Health Canada.

In addition to a comprehensive set of more than 200 tests, Health Canada also reviews all additional scientifically credible studies that exist.

Through this process pesticides receive a greater breadth of scrutiny than any other regulated product and only those products that meet Health Canada’s strict health and safety standards are registered for sale and use.

The fact of the matter is that a provincial ban of pesticide use in B.C. would prevent residents from using safe and effective tools, approved by Health Canada, to protect their personal property from insect, weed and disease infestations.

Lorne Hepworth

president,

CropLife Canada

Just Posted

New Coast Guard radar boosts marine traffic monitoring off B.C. coast

Six radar installations set up for Georgia Strait to Queen Charlotte Strait to Prince Rupert

Uchucklesaht Tribe purchases former Redford School

Property will be a “multi-use building” similar to The Thunderbird

Merry Makers create new craft fair for Port Alberni

Hansen Hall fair begins as Work of Heart organizers retire

Port Alberni highland dancers invited to North American competition

Kali Nahorney received honourable mention medals in two categories

VIDEO: People with diabetes meet their alert dogs

A diabetic alert dog is trained to detect low blood sugar in people who have Type 1 diabetes

China says butt out; Canada calls for release of “arbitrarily” detained Muslims

A Chinese foreign ministry spokeswoman accused Canada’s envoy of going beyond their diplomatic roles

Dead Saskatoon tattoo artist’s skin removed and preserved

The skin was removed in honour of the well known artist’s work

North Cowichan is Canada’s hot spot on Wednesday

The Warmland lives up to its name

B.C. Realtor suspended after helping intern forge note about sick grandma

Vancouver real estate agent Jaideep Singh Puri has to pay fine, take ethics course

Offensive Facebook post by Okanagan Conservative riding sparks outrage

Post taken down after Conservative MP in neighbouring riding condemns it and demands removal

Judge rules against ALC on rural B.C. subdivision

The ALC can’t change the definition of an acre, the judge ruled.

John Horgan shrugs off low turnout, change to referendum option

‘No’ proportional representation group says voting should be extended

Two more government pot shops to open in Kamloops

Two private applications are also in the queue to come before city council by the end of the year

Most Read