LETTER: A tax revolt is rising as B.C. residents say no more increases

It is getting ridiculously expensive to live in B.C.; it is time to cut all of the unions loose…

LETTER: A tax revolt is rising as B.C. residents say no more increases

To the Editor,

It is getting ridiculously expensive to live in B.C.; it is time to cut all of the unions loose. They are 100 percent the reason it costs too much for the average person to live here.

I saw a recent television news story that a gentleman who owns a commercial building in downtown Vancouver is receiving a tax bill of $53,000 dollars for one year of taxes. Where are politicians’ heads at? Do they want to create a welfare state? The government is placing way too much pressure on the average taxpayers and entrepreneurs.

There are far too many agencies whose members and CEOs get their paycheques from the BC government (the taxpayers).

They have no consideration for anyone else but what they can get for themselves, and don’t worry where the monies come from. Well it is the taxpayer—us. All residents of the province are paying for a few to live very large, while creating a lot of hardship for everyone else.

In my opinion let them run their own like a business and then the market will tell them what they are worth. It may be time for a tax revolt to take back control of this never ending cycle. At the end of the day all government paid workers were hired to work for the public. All the above agencies contribute to the ever rising costs to live here in B.C. and something needs to be done. Every raise they get then everything must go up to cover the costs. It is time that the B.C. government takes strong actions to control the cost for the taxpayer; these employees should be thankful that the taxpayer has created a job for them in the first place.

There is not an endless well full of money. It is nearly empty. If the government does nothing to control these issues, there will be a huge amount of bankruptcies because why should the hard-working, non-union people be taxed to death?

There should be at least a 10- to 15-year freeze on any raises period, to let the rest of us catch up a bit. I own and operate a small business and I would like to make a lot more money. But because I am in the open market, the market dictates what my company can earn. We do not get to go on strike and demand from anybody more money—it does not work that way.

The gravy train must come to a end.

Bill Scott,

Port Alberni