Letter writer’s thinking skewed

A letter writer had it wrong, a reader says.

To the Editor,

Andrew Weaver makes two errors of scientific method in Tom Fletcher’s Sept. 14 column (B.C. Views, online, www.albernivalleynews.com).

He commits the error of endless extrapolation, as though there were no variation in causal factors and no negative feedback mechanisms.

Second, he fails to look into history – he uses only the period since the climate stopped cooling, which coincides with satellite data becaming available.

(Just prior to that, activists were trying to stampede politicians into controlling people in order to stop global cooling.)

How could the small wooden ship the St. Roch transit the true Northwest Passage several decades ago without the help of the powerful ice breakers that help ships today?

Archaeologists have identified driftwood on Greenland beaches now blocked by ice year round, and traced it back to the areas of the Yukon, Alaska, and Siberia, concluding that 6000 years ago the Arctic Ocean was open enough for ice to travel that far. And there’s evidence that polar bears survived through that period.

A thousand years ago the Vikings farmed Greenland, during what is called the “Medieval Warm Period”, according to archaeologists from the University of Alberta. They gave up a few hundred years later when the climate cooled, toward a low we may still be recovering from.

Weaver is well known as a promoter of the blame-humans theory of climate change. He and fellow alarmists deny a warmer climate existed several times in the past. They ignore fundamental discrepancies between their theories and the reality of sea level changing very slowly, middle atmosphere temperatures not following their predictions, and water vapour changes.

Why does anyone listen to the unscientific negativity of such academics?

Keith Sketchley,

Saanich

Just Posted

Kuu-us Crisis Line Society kicks off 21st annual Festival of Trees

26 Port Alberni businesses will decorate trees on Dec. 9 for festival

Sproat Lake residents call for more control over growth

Residents ask Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District to crack down on bylaws

Port Alberni’s John Jack joins First Nations LNG Alliance

Jack represents Huu-ay-aht First Nations’ Kwispaa LNG project

Property assessments to rise again on Vancouver Island

Some areas could see their assessments spike as much as 20 per cent

VIDEO: This B.C. school leads country in vaccine donations to UNICEF

Federally funded Kids Boost Immunity uses quizzes to earn vaccinations

Boeser scores 3, Pettersson has 5 points as Canucks hammer Blues

Vancouver picks up impressive 6-1 win in St. Louis

B.C. police stop drunk driver who offered up burger instead of ID

Roadblock checks over the weekend found at least two other impaired drivers

In Canada, the term ‘nationalism’ doesn’t seem to have a bad rap. Here’s why

Data suggest that Canadians don’t see the concept of nationalism the way people do in the United States

Small quake recorded west of Vancouver Island

No injuries or tsunami warning after 5.4 rumble felt some 400 kilometres from Victoria

B.C. suspends Chinese portion of Asian forestry trade mission due to Huawei arrest

Huawei’s chief financial officer Meng Wanzhou was detained at the request of U.S. in Vancouver

Canadians spent $1.7 billion dollars online in December 2017

Online retail sales accounted for 3.4 per cent of total retail sales

2-year investigations nets $900,000 in refunds for payday loan customers

Consumer Protection BC says selling practices were ‘aggressive and deceptive’

China: Canada’s detention of Huawei exec ‘vile in nature’

Huawei is the biggest global supplier of network gear for phone and internet company

Most Read