Letters of the week – Feb. 25

Refugees, cyclists and double standards spurred on letters to the editor this week.

Differing opinion not ‘ignorance’

To the Editor,

Re: Refugee family to arrive ‘soon’, Feb. 18.

I definitely take offence of my opinion being called ignorance because I talk about the refugee situation that is coming to the Alberni Valley.

I believe that from what I read in the newspaper and see on TV about other countries that are taking in refugees and their plight to change the place that is welcoming them, is plain enough to me to be giving my opinion without being called ignorant, or afraid of the unknown. I find it offensive as a citizen of the Valley to be referred to as such.

I have my opinion and I will stick to it regardless of somebody else’s opinion; this is Canada and do not forget it. Maybe that is why we are so opinionated in this country, because we are allowed to be.

Remember this is Canada, and we have freedom of speech regardless of what the situation is, and the situation in this instance, in my opinion, is not good, according to TV and media reports from around the world. Or would you say that they are ignorant also?

This is our Valley and we have a say in it, regardless of whether someone else likes it or not.

Dave Noble,

Port Alberni

 

Enforce rules for cyclists

To the Editor,

I certainly hope that the city’s managers can justify the waste of our tax money when they decided that the Gertrude Street bridge needed fixing.

I hope that the bridge is in need of urgent repairs, because the bridge does not get that much use on a daily basis.

Now for the bicycle right of ways. First of all you need to enforce the rules and the non-rules.  Cyclists do not seem to know how to obey the road rules. I know a lot of Port Alberni’s drivers are just as bad but if they are in an accident they may have a chance.  Bicycle riders do not have much of a chance in an accident and pay no insurance.

Until the city managers rectify the large truck situation,  bicycle riders will always be at risk.

Steven Reiter,

Port Albern

 

Break free of clothing conformity

To the Editor,

Thanks to the mayor of Coquitlam for his gender-equality initiative (wearing the same suit every day for 15 months), but I beg to offer t’other side of the coin.

For indeed, women have more accepted freedom than men to express their individuality through their style of dress.

Keeping pace with fashion trends, women have to be creatively innovative: a powerful trait that’s valued in a competitively entrepreneurial business world.

Men, on t’other hand, are slaves to a comparatively boring dress code: the suit and tie. Or, as Dad used to call it: the monkey suit.

So while we recognize gender equality between men and women, let us free our brothers from their noose-tied collars and ridiculous layers of clothing, especially in summer.

With more open collars, perhaps there would be more open thinking between diplomats and warring world leaders.

Liz Stonard,

Port Alberni

 

Just Posted

Alberni’s Anne Ostwald named a finalist for Premier’s Award

Alberni District Secondary School teacher encourages students to find their passion

Tofino and Ucluelet prepare for daytime Hwy. 4 closures and eight-hour power outage

“We know that there’s never a good time for an outage and thank the community for their patience.”

Port Alberni’s Healthy Harvest Farm closing

Operation will merge with Hupacasath Community Garden

Port Alberni Black Sheep hang on to win season opener

Sheep face James Bay Rugby Club in first game of the season

Port Alberni man arrested for breaking windows

29-year-old Port Alberni resident was caught breaking a window in a local residence

B.C. RCMP turn to Const. Scarecrow to shock speeders into slowing down

New addition will watch over drivers from a Coquitlam median for first-of-its-kind pilot in Canada

B.C. home to 1/3 of Canada’s overdose deaths in first 3 months of the year

There were 1,036 overdose deaths in the first three months of the year, with 94 per cent accidental

B.C. candidate moves from hospice care to council race

He beat terminal cancer twice and entered hospice when he decided to run for council.

Canadian tobacco exec pushes back against vaping health concerns

A warning from Interior Health about the unknown health risks of vaping is getting a partial rebuke

Ministry of Agriculture commits $300,000 to help B.C. farmers obtain land

B.C. Land Matching Program supports access to affordable farmland for young farmers

Canadian air force short 275 pilots

Attrition outpaces recruitment and training claims Air Force

Teacher suspended after physically shushing, saying ‘shut up’ to student

Grade 5 student reported feeling ‘confused and a little scared’

A B.C. society helps to reforest Crown land after wildfires

Forest Enhancement Society of BC focuses on wildfire mitigation and the reforestation

Most Read