Letters of the week – June 16

Provincial exams, street signs and Port Alberni's industrial heritage spurred on letters to the editor this week.

Getting rid of school exams no big deal

To the Editor,

The elimination of school exams is no big deal. Back in the days of my high school years, there was a program called Recommendations.

If you had a C-plus average for the year or higher in a subject course, you would be recommended, meaning that you would not have to write a final exam. You only wrote final  exams with grades below a C-plus average.

In summary, final exams are only a summary of questions that you have studied all year long. Why duplicate and waste time?

Joe Sawchuk,

Duncan

Street signs too small anyway

To the Editor,

I moved here from northwestern B.C. in 2009. When I first moved here I found the street signs hard to read and confusing. I found the signs so hard to read because they are so small and not placed in the centre of the street on cables, where they would be easier to see.

When one street like Third Avenue, Stamp Avenue and Gertrude Street has three different names, this is truly confusing for newcomers and visitors. So I prefer one name.

Eric Hockaday,

Port Alberni

Mac-Blo deserves recognition

To the Editor,

I worked for MacMillan Bloedel for 43.5 years, three and a half at Somass mill and 40 years at MacMillan Bloedel Ltd. Alberni Pulp and Paper as a steam plant engineer.

MacMillan Bloedel had five divisions: Plywood, APD, Somass, Pulp and Paper and Logging. They were the Alberni Valley’s biggest employer for decades.

MacMillan Bloedel gave donations to our community for the swimming pool, multiplex, soccer fields, light poles, lights, and many other donations. MacMillan Bloedel is a vital part of our community’s history and our city grew because of MacMillan Bloedel.

Gertrude Street, Stamp Avenue and Third Avenue should they be combined should be renamed MacMillan Bloedel Boulevard.

MacMillan Bloedel employed people from our city and those employees built our city by supporting other businesses and community members. We should honour them.

Ernie Luchka,

Port Alberni

 

Industry yes, pollution no way

To the Editor,

I really think  the new mayor and council are doing some good. The new Dry Creek spillway, the move to get log trucks off the main streets, maybe even the bits and pieces bridge work done at double the estimated costs.

The good work promoting the arts district, the quay, and the port authority’s new walkway by the Fisherman’s Wharf are all great. They’re trying to make the town a better, easier place to live.

However, the reasoning for the plywood land sale is not clear, and lack of public input makes the whole thing smell of backroom deals even though it may be squeaky clean.

The letter to the editor last week about the charcoal filter making operation next to the sawmill however is alarming.    Why have meetings and concerns about air quality,  and let this new operation that burns huge quantities of wood start up?

Clearly the city should have said no way. Our air is not a freebie for industry to pollute. Is that why they located here, to poison us because they could, because no one would say anything?

Federal land or provincial….no matter…it’s polluting the air that the citizens of Port Alberni have to breathe, and there is no monitoring or restrictions. What is this, a step back into the past, where citizen groups have to actually sue the responsible parties to protect air, water, and lands?

If you want Port Alberni to get better publicity and become a place people want to live, polluters need to be reined in.

Why put up with, or invite, businesses to this natural paradise when they have no respect for people, including the first nations communities that live here? It’s really a big step backwards, especially since the coal port thing died its natural death.

Michael Wright,

Port Alberni

 

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