Letters of the week – June 2

Trails and work for apprentices sparked letters to the editor this week.

Scott Kenny Trail needs TLC, no more

To the Editor,

Although I wasn’t very happy at first with the Scott Kenny Trail that was being built, I accepted that it was a worthwhile endeavour to have another route across town. I think it is being used quite a bit. And that’s good.

But please, city council, don’t build any more trail! There are many very nice trails through the bush in the ravine already. All they need is a little brushing up, embellishments like steps, buttressing or improving the cut in the trail.

The trail as it is, allows for a passage from south to north and back, suitable for cyclists strong enough to pedal up those slopes. Few are. Perhaps mobility-challenged individuals would like to make it to the bottom on this trail but pushing a wheelchair up those slopes would be exhausting, perhaps impossible.

What has also been achieved, is a destruction of the intimacy and charm of the place. Others have said that the slopes are so steep that they worry about the gravel on the trail slipping, resulting in a fall. People walk down the edge because the footing is better.

Beyond the current trail construction lies a network of trails made by people and animals, and kids on adventure. This is why I go down to Rogers Creek; to see the spectacular maples hanging over the gravel, to hide in the salmonberry and sword-fern, to be impressed by the shale cliffs there, and to jump in the pool at the swimming hole, that I’ve been told has now been destroyed.

I urge city council to give direction to staff to stop anymore building trails like what has already built. Use what money you have to connect and enhance existing trails, and create barriers along the cliff. This will increase the attractiveness of the experience rather than destroying it.

Sandy McRuer,

Port Alberni

 

No jobs for apprentices

To the Editor,

Re: Harper-style ads carry on in B.C. (B.C. Views, May 21).

The sad truth about the advertising for trades training is that there are not jobs for apprentices in their field.

My granddaughter is in month five of the six-month Camosun College trades training program to start her career as an electrician. Not only is no one hiring now, but no one from the class that finished in December 2015 has been able to get hired as an apprentice.

I wonder how many apprentices B.C. would have if ferries were built here instead of in Poland.

Ronald Schlosberg,

Victoria