Letters of the week – Oct. 20

Cantimber and Good Samaritans spurred on letters to the editor this week.

Citizens’ concerns are serious

To the Editor,

Re: Cantimber Biotech.

NIMBY? Wow!

How about a flue emitting pyrolysis gases because the combustion chamber had a cracked valve and the neighbourhood suffered from pyrolysis gas exposure?  Not like some campfire smoke and not like steam from a boiling pot of water as some would like everyone to believe.

This was an actual hazardous event, from a poorly situated pyrolysis plant, that resulted in legitimate health ailments. The plant had to be shut down on three separate occasions.

I would like to thank the mayor and city council for taking our concerns seriously.  Cantimber has only themselves to blame for this mess.

Shirley Brewer,

Port Albern

 

Neighbouring workers feel plant’s effects

To the Editor,

Re: Cantimber doing its best, says worker, Letters, Oct. 13.

I work on the timber deck at Alberni Pacific Division right next door to Cantimber Biotech.  I wish Mr. Moore could have been inside with me when the fumes from his “campfire” caused me such throat irritation that I had to go to our first aid room for awhile.

Mr. Moore has the luxury of only being exposed to the fumes from his place of employment for a few minutes on his way in to the plant and on his way to his vehicle on the way home (about 30 feet from door to plant). I park across Harbour Road and while walking into and out from work could smell and see the woodsmoke/fumes coming from their stack every day that it was in operation— definitely not just steam because the smoke was brown.

The paper mill is not perfect either, sometimes I see blue “steam” coming from there but definitely not brown.

I am not the only one at APD either as smoke was affecting people in the main sawmill, the filing room and even the drivers in the yard. Mr. Moore is safe inside while the smoke from his plant affects the surrounding neighbourhood.

I am all for more industry and employment in this city, have lived here all my life (50-plus years), but not at the expense of our collective health.

Chris Forbes,

Port Alberni

It’s up to us to keep up the pressure

To the Editor,

It seems incredible that Cantimber is pursuing its bid to push its wood-burning charcoal plant forward at the expense of polluting the air we breathe in the Alberni Valley.

They do not have the social contract to impose respiratory health problems and the deterioration of our air quality onto our community.  If they ever do get going, they could be the subject of a class action lawsuit, once air samples and analysis are completed by an independent third party.

Clearly, if we stop this now we will all be better off.

I am surprised the Port Alberni Port Authority has the gall to dump this development on the citizens of Port Alberni in the first place. We need the port authority to think of the people in the Alberni Valley first, not how to grow their authority by the courting of endless coal truck projects and now wood burning plants.

Now is the time for us to stand up and say no.

The so-called scientist that presented at the last meeting on the issue of wood-burning and charcoal production was of little value in assessing the situation objectively. Expert witnesses are easily purchased to support one side or the other of any issue.  I could easily find one to come and tell us how truly poisonous and dangerous the plant really is.

Thus the sum total of that exercise was precisely zero.

Letters from the offending company’s employees also do little but further undercut Cantimber’s credibility.  Without doubt citizens of the Valley do care about their own backyards, and their town. If they didn’t it would not be worth living here as every polluting, dumping corporation on the planet would be lined up to start poisoning us.

Corporations look at the ability to dump effluents and noxious gases into the environment as a freebie. That is why we have to say “no more” in Port Alberni.

It’s time to support our council and ask them to say no to this Cantimber wood-burning, air polluting operation.  A few jobs and a little money are not worth jeopardizing  the long-term goals of increasing our population and turning the city into a prosperous healthy place to live.

Michael H. Wright,

Port Alberni

‘Mr. Bell made a difference’

To the Editor,

Re: Tim Bell rescues Berkeley the dog.

It is always a feeling of appreciation I get when I read stories about humans going to help others in desperate need, even if the “other” is a dog.

Mr. Bell made a difference, he made a decision, followed through with the task at hand, twice going under to do what he could and that shows more about Mr. Bell than words can say.

Hopefully this will inspire others.

G. Dickie,

Victoria

 

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