Letters to the editor: TiberWest, school closures, Lib’s attitude and Fletcher

Letters to the editor about a variety of subjects.

Whole story isn’t out there

To the Editor,

If there is anybody still left in this valley, especially residents of the Beaver Creek and Beaufort areas, who still believe that the TimberWest Forest Company is not responsible for the mess they  made in the Beaufort Mountains from Kitsuksis Creek— which runs through McLean Mill in the northeast side of the valley and many more streams and water causes including Beaver Creek itself all the way to Wolf Creek at the west end—should give their heads a shake.

Look at the facts of what really happened in the Beaufort Mountains. TimberWest officials spoke at public meetings, including the regional board and city council, concerning their so-called logging practices in watersheds and everywhere else.

Speaking of watersheds, this dumb old logger would like to see an audit and inspection done in the China Creek watershed by impartial forest officials who are not under the thumb of TimberWest and the Private Lands Council; someone with concern  for our environment.

TimberWest needs to clean up its action and show what a good neighbour it is.

Wayne Crowley,

Port Alberni

 

Closures are a fact of life

To the Editor,

It seems to be a crime everywhere in B.C. to close schools but okay to close them in the other nine provinces.

Student enrolment is the key issue, and enrolment numbers will never return to what they used to be in the old days. The newer generation is holding back on having children, and when they do, one child seems to be the norm.

The whole idea  of closing these schools is to keep the ones that are open at full capacity.

Why keep a school open just to pay janitors, heating, lighting, maintenance, etc. when the building is half full?

These taxpayers that complain that schools are being closed are two-faced.  Many of them have already downsized their living. For example, going to live in a condo because the house was too big, and why pay for all the expenses when it is not needed.

Teachers are the biggest joke. They are against school closures, but you overhear them talking in public in malls, etc. to friends, that they have sold their house and moved to a condo because the kids are now gone on their own, and why keep paying for all of the upkeep when there is only two of them in the house.

Isn’t B.C. a province in Canada? These complainers don’t seem to think so.

Joe Sawchuk,

Duncan

 

Co-operation necessary

To the Editor,

B.C teachers have advocated for adequate student/teacher ratios, including enough special needs personnel, since the 1970s when I contemplated becoming a teacher.  Instead, I became a nurse and we are still advocating for adequate patient/nurse ratios to safeguard patient care.

So I’m encouraged by the B.C Supreme Court’s decision regarding educational class size and urge the B.C government to abide by and not waste any more taxpayers’ money appealing this recent decision.

Rather than disregard well-educated and experienced professionals and vilify them as “special (unionized) interest groups”, like members of any political party, government needs to adopt a better attitude of co-operation.

Liz Stonard,

Port Alberni

 

Column wasn’t quote-worthy

To the Editor,

It is hard to miss the irony in the title ‘Old Man Take a Look at the Facts’ in Tom Fletcher’s column (BC Views, Jan. 23). What was meant to be a witty reference of Neil Young’s famous song and his supposed ignorance could just as easily be referring to Fletcher himself.

Perhaps old Mr. Young and his allies don’t have all of their facts straight,but,then again, neither does old Mr. Fletcher.

In actuality, the clearest fact that Fletcher presents is that he has an issue with environmentalists, climate scientists and First Nations activists.

In fact, his preoccupation with putting down and disclaiming anyone who questions the status quo is a consistent theme in his column.

I believe everyone has the right to their opinion, including Mr. Fletcher.

That said, I am offering mine. I feel that Fletcher’s viewpoint is outdated. We are facing some serious crises on our planet that can possibly be diverted if we work together.

The divisive attitude of dinosaurs like Fletcher who insist on focusing on their prejudices at the expense of the truth are holding up positive progress. Meanwhile, the very people he belittles are working hard towards a healthier future for everyone. What is he doing?

I suggest that Tom Fletcher takes some time to think about the next line in Neil Young’s quote-worthy song: ‘I’m a lot like you are’.

Miriam Turner,

Port Alberni

 

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