Opinion on EHS ‘disappointing’

VIHA's Dr. Joanna Oda should look at newer blind tests regarding Wi-Fi waves causing sickness, says reader.

To the Editor,

Re: Wi-Fi waves causing sickness, says woman, July 18.

It is very sad to hear a public health officer, like Dr. Oda, say in essence that because there is “no universally agreed upon definition of EHS” that it doesn’t exist.

I daresay it is virtually impossible to get a “universally agreed” opinion about anything, but is that necessary for a condition to exist?

The blind tests to which she refers, saying people failed, have been shown to have been poorly done, with expectations that immediate exposure to a specific radiofrequency (RF) would produce immediate symptoms. EHS doesn’t work like that for most people.

For many the symptoms increase with time and additive exposure.

Why did Dr. Oda not mention the newer blind tests done showing about one in three people suffer tachycardia when exposed to certain frequencies, such as those from cordless phones? Or others that show blood clumping (the rouleaux effect) after using a wireless laptop or a cellphone?

Perhaps she is only aware of the tests industry mentions.

With the number of people becoming “sensitive” to RF radiation increasing as a result of prolonged and increasing exposure to wireless devices, it is vital that our medical professionals become educated.

The University of Alberta Medical School’s Dr. Stephen Genuis teaches doctors about this growing health problem. I would suggest that the BC Medical Association invite Dr. Genuis to put on a clinic, and that Dr. Perry Kendall (Dr. Oda’s boss), Dr. Oda, and the other provincial medical officers attend.

Waiting until the world agrees on a definition is not the answer.

Sharon Noble,

Port Alberni