Reader sees the light

The feds are considering banning incandescent bulbs. We need to let our MPs know that we do not want the bulbs to be banned.

To the Editor,

I heard lighting expert Howard Brandston interviewed by Michael Enright.

He explained that compact fluorescent (CF) bulbs, which have been sold to both governments and the general public as being a significant way to reduce energy costs, are of questionable value.

The reality is that they often burn out far sooner than the manufacturer’s stated seven years and they contain toxic mercury gas which can be harmful if the bulbs are broken in the home.

Because they contain mercury, the bulbs must also be disposed of properly.

Mr. Brandston stated that CFs were marketed to the world by an ailing lighting fixture industry as a significant action against climate change.

However, they are not made to be turned on and off frequently and except for commercial establishments and locations in which lights are left on for extended periods.

It is safer and just as energy efficient (when we consider the upstream and downstream costs of manufacturing and disposal) to use incandescent bulbs and just turn them off when you are not in the room.

The federal government is now considering banning incandescent bulbs. We need to let our MPs know that we do not want the safer, more economical and just as energy efficient (if turned off when we are not in the room) incandescent bulbs to be banned. The wise use of  light bulbs is one more way to “Occupy Port Alberni”.

John Mayba,

Port Alberni

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