What’s a mom to do with a picky eating child

Dr. Danielle Ranaud has some pointers for a mother whose picky eating child is driving her to distraction.

Dear Dr. Renaud:

I have a very picky eater. Thomas is four and goes through phases of eating that are driving me crazy.

First, he won’t eat anything other than one item for weeks on end and then he doesn’t want that anymore and I can’t get him to eat anything else.

I am worried that he is going to starve to death. It ends up in a big fight and him in tears. What should I do?

Worried

 

Dear Worried:

Thomas sounds like a typical four-year-old to me. This is a very normal phase of development for children. It is a time where he is asserting his independence and testing his ability to control things.

There are several ways to deal with this that will make you both happy. In order to give him the independence and control he desires— and which are good for him—let him choose from a menu of food choices. They must be controlled choices though.

At four, he is not capable of dealing with a question like —“What do you want for dinner?” He will always default to what he likes best.

As a fun activity with him, create a picture file of food that he likes. You can cut pictures from magazines, download them from the Internet or he can also draw pictures if you can’t find pictures he likes. He will be a lot more cooperative when it comes time to choose items if he has had involvement in the collecting of the choices.

Sit down and create menu choices for no more than three days. Choose all three meals and snacks—just like you would on a diet or healthy eating plan.

This way, not only are you getting healthy food choices, but you are teaching him how to make good choices.

Put your menu items on a white board or stick on the fridge (the fridge is a great place to keep things for kids besides their artwork—they are easily seen).

He should be a lot more co-operative this way.

 

Dr. Danielle Renaud helps parents deal with both everyday and unusual parenting and family issues. She can be reached at 778-421-1925 or drdrenaud@yahoo.ca.

Just Posted

Tyee Club celebrates 80 years in Port Alberni

James Clark wins Fisherman of the Year award

John Horgan promises action after fatal mid-Island bus crash

Premier cites students, local Indigneous community as reason to repair the road

BCHL: Alberni Valley Bulldogs rally for the win with five goals in third period

Port Alberni team has won two games in a row at home

Forestry watchdog warned B.C. government about Bamfield Road in 2008

Ombudsman’s specific concerns re-surface in wake of fatal bus crash

Swedish visitors celebrate steam donkey at McLean Mill—without the steam

Volunteers celebrate 90th birthday of mill’s vintage steam donkey

VIDEO: B.C. man accused of assaulting sex worker loses temper in interrogation

Defence lawyer says statements made by accused Curtis Sagmoen should be deemed inadmissible

B.C. man guilty of first-degree murder in Yukon killing

Edward James Penner, 22, was given the mandatory life sentence for the 2017 slaying of 25-year-old Adam Cormack

Woman stabbed at least five times in Nelson during random attack

Victim is in hospital, suspect is in police custody

Victoria man spots online photo of his totem pole 11 years after it was stolen

Mark Trueman restored the pole himself before it was stolen off of his property in Duncan

‘I’d do it again,’ says B.C. man who swam naked, drunk in Toronto shark tank

David Weaver, of Nelson, was drunk when he went to Ripley’s Aquarium in Toronto on Oct. 12 2018

How to react to Trudeau’s racist photos? With humility, B.C. prof says

‘We are now treating racism as a crime that you cannot recover from’

Horvat paces Canucks to 6-1 pre-season win over Oilers

Vancouver improves to 3-1 in NHL exhibition action

Legislature gifts, clothing, travel need better control, B.C. auditor says

Audit follows suspensions of managers by Speaker Darryl Plecas

‘Really disturbing:’ Trudeau’s racist photos worry B.C. First Nation chief

Wet’suwet’en Chief concerned the photos will sow fear in Indigenous communities

Most Read