Whose snow job is the HST?

Bill VanderZalm is using public in his HST fight to climb out of political grave, a Nanoose reader says.

To the Editor,

My wife and I have two small businesses in Parksville, have no political affiliation, have not been paid by the pro-HST campaign, and yet we wholeheartedly support the HST.

Why? Here’s a few reasons: we have no political axe to grind.

We prefer to look at the evidence our own businesses give us, rather than the spin produced by the anti-HST coalition.

Here are the simple facts: administration of a single tax is far simpler than the old, convoluted two-tax system. There is not single bona-fide trained economist in Canada who would support going back to the old ways as the better solution.

What’s good for the province is good for us, our businesses, the economy as a whole. The HST is better for all business, small to large, not just ‘big business’ as the coalition loves to point out. Good business creates jobs—your jobs.

Bill VanderZalm as the saviour of the Common  People? Forgive me if I have my doubts as to the motivation of Bill and his ilk—how about springboard back into politics?

We all love our public services, there’s never enough of them, and it seems most of the province wants someone else to pay for them, such as maybe the tax fairy. Want to go back to the ‘good old days’? Sure, go right ahead. But you won’t like the outcome one bit.

And don’t expect VanderZalm and Co. to help, either, after the fact. They’ll be too busy gloating about how they’ve been able to dupe British Columbians into acting as stepping stones out of a political grave.

Harold Grindl,

Nanoose Bay

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