First Nations culture runs deep

Edward Ross from the Tseshaht First Nation took part in a once-in-a-lifetime event during the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver. Ross, 29, was chosen from hundreds of applicants from across Canada to participate in the Vancouver 2010 Indigenous Youth Gathering.

Edward Ross from the Tseshaht First Nation took part in a once-in-a-lifetime event during the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver. Ross, 29, was chosen from hundreds of applicants from across Canada to participate in the Vancouver 2010 Indigenous Youth Gathering.

The event, which wrapped up Feb. 14, was hosted by the four host First Nations and the Vancouver Olympic Organizing Committee (VANOC).

More than 300 First Nations, Inuit and Metis youth between the ages of 19 and 29 participated and performed in various cultural activities at the Olympics. The event focused on healthy living, sport, leadership, sustainability and the Olympic truce.

Ross isn’t the only West Coast aboriginal person involved in the cultural aspect of the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver and Whistler. Dolly McRae and daughter Annie Watts featured their First Nations cookbook, Where People Feast, and some of their recipes at BC Showcase in Robson Square on Feb. 10. From that, they have been invited to appear on NBC’s Today Show.

Joe Martin, a member of the Tla-o-qui-aht First Nation on the West Coast, carved a canoe that will be part of Tofino’s B.C. Street pavilion at the Richmond O Zone during the Olympics.

Martin has his own carving shack at the B.C. Street section of the O Zone until Feb. 28.

Artist Patrick Amos was also invited to demonstrate his carvings and paintings at the Rosedale on Robson Hotel between now and April.

Ron Hamilton of Port Alberni currently has an exhibit of thliitsapilthim, or ceremonial curtains, at the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery at the University of B.C. Backstory: Nuu-chah-nulth Ceremonial Curtains and the Work of Ki-Ke-In is part of the 2010 Cultural Olympiad in Vancouver.

And of course, famed Alberni Valley artist Connie Watts is the project manager of the Venues Aboriginal Art Program, and part of the Vancouver Organizing Committee (VANOC) for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games.

— With files from Westcoaster.ca

editor@albernivalleynews.com

Ed Ross, left, participates in an awards ceremony during the World Under-17 Hockey Championships in Port Alberni last year.

Edward Ross from the Tseshaht First Nation took part in a once-in-a-lifetime event during the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver. Ross, 29, was chosen from hundreds of applicants from across Canada to participate in the Vancouver 2010 Indigenous Youth Gathering.

The event, which wrapped up Feb. 14, was hosted by the four host First Nations and the Vancouver Olympic Organizing Committee (VANOC).

More than 300 First Nations, Inuit and Metis youth between the ages of 19 and 29 participated and performed in various cultural activities at the Olympics. The event focused on healthy living, sport, leadership, sustainability and the Olympic truce.

Ross isn’t the only West Coast aboriginal person involved in the cultural aspect of the 2010 Winter Olympics in Vancouver and Whistler. Dolly McRae and daughter Annie Watts featured their First Nations cookbook, Where People Feast, and some of their recipes at BC Showcase in Robson Square on Feb. 10. From that, they have been invited to appear on NBC’s Today Show.

Joe Martin, a member of the Tla-o-qui-aht First Nation on the West Coast, carved a canoe that will be part of Tofino’s B.C. Street pavilion at the Richmond O Zone during the Olympics.

Martin has his own carving shack at the B.C. Street section of the O Zone until Feb. 28.

Artist Patrick Amos was also invited to demonstrate his carvings and paintings at the Rosedale on Robson Hotel between now and April.

Ron Hamilton of Port Alberni currently has an exhibit of thliitsapilthim, or ceremonial curtains, at the Morris and Helen Belkin Art Gallery at the University of B.C. Backstory: Nuu-chah-nulth Ceremonial Curtains and the Work of Ki-Ke-In is part of the 2010 Cultural Olympiad in Vancouver.

And of course, famed Alberni Valley artist Connie Watts is the project manager of the Venues Aboriginal Art Program, and part of the Vancouver Organizing Committee (VANOC) for the 2010 Olympic and Paralympic Winter Games.

— With files from Westcoaster.ca

editor@albernivalleynews.com