Best B.C. cities to live in: millennial edition

Other local municipalities score at bottom of list from real estate blog

Millennials are the generation often criticized for not always knowing what they want, but a new report has pin pointed the most ideal cities to live in based off nine millennial ideals.

In a listical released Wednesday, Canadian real estate blog Point2 Homes compared 85 of the most populous cities in the country – and the results might surprise you.

The survey determined Quebec City to be the number one most attractive place for millennials, followed by Victoria and then Guelph.

A few reasons for Quebec City’s favourable rating plays into the present and future goals for millennials: a low crime rate, the third lowest unemployment rate in the country and an above average yearly income. In addition, the benchmark price for a home is roughly $250,000.

Victoria received such a high rating due to its low unemployment rate and top position for climate. It also received props for topping the list of Canada’s most bikeable cities in UBC’s Cycling in Cities Research program.

Other B.C. municipalities to make the list include Saanich in sixth place, New Westminster in 11th place and Burnaby in 14th place.

Meanwhile, none of Canada’s largest cities – Toronto, Montreal, Ottawa and Calgary – made the top five, while Vancouver placed 10th. In fact, seven out of the top 10 cities have a population lower than 500,000.

Outside of the Lower Mainland, Kelowna was rated 62nd most ideal, followed by Prince George at 66 and Kamloops at 73.

The report rated cities based on nine factors: income, housing affordability, unemployment rate, life satisfaction, crime rate, healthcare quality, level of education, climate and population.

“Quality employment and affordable housing are two key factors that motivate millennials to settle down in a new city,” the report reads.

“But this upbeat generation obsessed with life-work balance is looking for more than just a well-paying job and a nice house. They want engaging leisure activities, opportunities to socialize with other like-minded millennials, eco-friendly resources, and a safe but exciting city where they can thrive.”

B.C. cities top best of the worst

While the province is a favourable contender with roughly 10 cities making the top 50 most ideal candidates for millennials to lay their roots, it’s also home to some of the worst.

Despite the report finding that the Township of Langley offers some of “the best wine in all of B.C.,” it topped the list of “least tempting millennials cities.”

The report cites the lowest rating possible is due to its high crime rate, a severely unaffordable housing market and drawing the second lowest employment rate in the country.

Chilliwack is also a notable contender for one of the worst millennial destinations. Despite it’s “active music scene,” low unemployment rate and a relatively mild climate, the report scored it with an extremely high crime rate and low number of residents with a bachelor’s degree or above, making it the 82nd most ideal hot spot.

Other B.C. cities that fared poorly included Maple Ridge in 78th spot, Abbotsford in 79th and Nanaimo in 80th.


@ashwadhwani
ashley.wadhwani@bpdigital.ca

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