Sarah Beairsto (left), seven-year-old Harper Harvey and Debra Legge with boxes of Girl Guides cookies outside a warehouse in North Delta on Saturday, March 12. (Photo: Tom Zillich)

Sarah Beairsto (left), seven-year-old Harper Harvey and Debra Legge with boxes of Girl Guides cookies outside a warehouse in North Delta on Saturday, March 12. (Photo: Tom Zillich)

FUNDRAISING

Girl Guides back to door-to-door cookie sales after 2 years of doing business differently

Chocolate/vanilla cookies sold in spring, and those who love the mint ones have to wait until fall

In a return to normal after a tough couple of years, Girl Guides are now selling cookies across B.C.

At a Delta warehouse Saturday (March 12), hundreds of cases of chocolate and vanilla sandwich cookies were loaded into group-leader vehicles for distribution to young Girl Guides to sell door-to-door and outside retail stores in Metro Vancouver.

Every $5 box of cookies helps fund outdoor camping adventures, science events, art workshops, community service projects and more.

“Obviously we’ve been restricted over the past couple of years during the pandemic, and changed the way the cookies were sold, but this year it’s pretty much a return to normal for us,” said Diamond Isinger, B.C. Provincial Commissioner for Girl Guides of Canada.

The cookies are sold until stock runs out, for a limited time.

“We’re selling tens of thousands of cases the spring, and we’re expecting our cookie order will increase coming into the fall, with the return of our mint cookies at that time, and what we hope is a full recovery from the pandemic — more camps, trips and other special opportunities that require fundraising,” said Isinger.

She acknowledges a public debate over Girl Guides’ spring (chocolate/vanilla) and fall (mint) cookie sales.

“All of the cookies are very well loved,” she insisted, “but the orders we get are typically the same in spring and fall, very similar demand in our communities. Many people like both, some like one or the other, but yes, it can be a polarizing debate.”

A “Cookie Finder Map” can be found on the website girlguides.ca.

Dare Foods makes the cookies and ships them across Canada with the help of AMJ Campbell Van Lines.

At the Delta warehouse on River Road, close to 3,500 cases of cookies were shipped this week. With 12 boxes per case, that’s around $210,000 in cookies to sell.

“They’re hot off the production line, and are fresh for people to enjoy,” Isinger said.

Other cookie warehouses are located in Victoria, Prince George and Kelowna.

Two years ago, in the very early days of the pandemic, Girl Guide cookies were shipped to local warehouses the week everything shut down.

“People may remember that we partnered with dozens of retailers across B.C. to stock our cookies on shelves,” Isinger recalled. “We also sold the cookies online and also encouraged our members to offer delivery where possible, as opposed to setting up in public.

“I think we learned a lot of valuable lessons and ideas during the pandemic,” she added, “and the Girl Guides motto, to be prepared, certainly helped get us through that experience and to continue our fundraising and our programming.”

Across B.C. heading into the pandemic, Isinger said, “we had 18,000 girls and woman involved with us, and we have several thousand members in the Surrey and Delta area, in the Fraser Valley area too.

“Our programs are in very high demand right now, so in terms of finding enough volunteers and creating enough spaces for girls to participate, we’re always looking for support to keep growing.”



tom.zillich@surreynowleader.com

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