Sweet Sicamous! Family makes gingerbread model of historic B.C. ship

With an estimated 10 hours left on the project, one of the creators says it’s nearly done

It might not float, as the real SS Sicamous did during record-level flooding earlier this year, but a gingerbread model of the famous historical ship is a pretty sweet project.

Made by Bill and Corinne Driedger and Bill’s sister and brother-in-law Nettie and Herman Steuernagel, Bill said he estimates the project still has another 10 hours left — which he called “getting close.”

“I spent most of the day yesterday on it,” Bill said. “Whenever we get a chance, we poke away at it. We were trying to get it done before Christmas, but I’m not sure that’s going to happen.”

Maybe not — especially if the couples dip too much into the eggnog.

“We did the Eiffel Tower a couple of years ago as a project, and we’ve been meaning to do another one, and since we did that in northern Alberta, I guess all four of us moved to Penticton,” Bill said, adding they floated the idea of doing the Sicamous last year.

“But we never got around to it with travel and whatnot. So today and this year we decided to tackle it. The sizing isn’t 100 per cent, but it’s just fun.”

Bill said it would have taken significantly longer to try to get everything to scale, but it isn’t a half-baked project, as it is. What might be the most challenging part coming up is the paddlewheel at the back of the steamship, something the team of bread-gineers (OK, that one might be a stretch) would have to tackle gingerly.

“I’m not sure how that’s going to happen,” he said.

Compared to the Eiffel Tower, Bill said the SS Sicamous has been a bit of a more complicated recipe.

“The Eiffel Tower’s so skinny, and we kind of just did it on a whim,” he said. “This guy, there’s a lot more going on trying to get it to look right.”

The cookies haven’t crumbled yet, but Bill said if a fatal mistake means sweet demise for the doughy ship, what remains is easily — and cheerfully — cleaned up.


@dustinrgodfrey

dustin.godfrey@pentictonwesternnews.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Lack of security: why Vancouver Island food production is on the decline

Big Read: agriculture a big, expensive commitment as advocates push to make us more food secure

Port Alberni campground featured in BC Ferries Vacations

China Creek Campground in the Alberni Valley will be highlighted as part… Continue reading

City of Port Alberni puts money into park improvements

Roger Creek, Blair parks receiving upgrades this spring, summer

City of Port Alberni ponders social development

Social planning commission would outlast councils

UPDATED: Nuu-chah-nulth First Nations ready to negotiate for fishing rights

Nations call on federal gov’t to settle fishing rights ‘within the true meaning of reconciliation’

VIDEO: Moose found licking salt off B.C. man’s pickup truck

Tab Baker was in his garage in Prince George when the small moose gave his truck a clean

New spill response bases on hold as pipeline paused

Future of six new bases, 125 jobs, on Vancouver Island in limbo over Kinder Morgan decision

B.C. student makes short-list for autism advocacy award

Brody Butts honoured for his role as a mentor and self-advocate

Austin Powers ‘Mini-Me’, Verne Troyer, dies at 49

Facebook page confirmed his death Saturday afternoon

Alberta man dead after snowmobile collision on B.C. mountain

The incident occurred on Boulder Mountain Friday morning

B.C. parents grieving teen’s overdose death say it started with opioid prescription

Elliot Eurchuk, 16, died at his Oak Bay home Friday, after taking street drugs

16 of 20 fastest improving B.C. schools are public: Fraser Institute

Independent elementary schools remain at top of the chart in think tank’s annual report card

UPDATED: 1 person dead after highway crash in Nanoose Bay

Accident happened just before 4 p.m. near Hillview Road

NAFTA: Talks continue through weekend in scramble to get a deal

Foreign Affairs Minister Chrystia Freeland called negotiations ‘perpetual’

Most Read