Members of the Improv Army hang out at the Capitol Theatre before a rehersal. From left to right: Neil Wagstaff

Improv Army play Capitol Theatre

The Improv Army will be entertaining audiences on Friday, April 22 at the Capitol Theatre with their tongue-in-cheek wittiness.

Experience a night of raw unscripted comedy with the Improv Army as they entertain viewers with their tongue-in-cheek wittiness on stage at the Capitol Theatre.

The five-member group will be performing next on Friday, April 22 at 7 p.m. and generally have a show once every eight weeks from September to June.

“Improv is all totally made up on the spot but there’s some structure provided by games,” said member Ryan Gander.

Audiences are encouraged to interact with the troupe and help with game suggestions by yelling out ideas to the cast.

Anybody that likes to laugh is going to enjoy the show, Gander said, especially if they appreciate zany offbeat humour.

Prior to showtime the group members have no idea what each other will say or do on stage but must role with whatever impromptu scenario their faced with.

“You’re supposed to be challenging each other to do something that they can’t do… If you’re an experienced player you can do pretty much everything, so now you need another player who’s trying to challenge your abilities and then when you pull it off it’s super funny,” Gander said.

Neil Wagstaff, improv member who typically comes up with the show’s themes, said before a scene the members have no idea who will be in that next scene or even what it will be about.

“The scene is not hard to keep going with the three of us,” Wagstaff said as he points to fellow improv members.

The spontaneous and offhand nature of the show is what makes it entertaining said James Brook, improv member.

“You can’t try and make it funny… unpredictability makes stuff funny.”

Brook is a seasoned improvisor who would perform for friends at the Capitol Theatre before the Improv Army was formed.

“If you want to strip it to it’s rawest form all improv is is an everyday conversation, it’s listening to what the person says, hearing it and adding to it,” Brook said.

The group said they do not hold auditions for those interested in joining the Improv Army and anyone is welcome. The encourage people to come out and try it and will help coach interested members until they are ready to go on stage.

Admission for an improv show is $5, they are family friendly and appropriate for children.

 

karly.blats@albernivalleynews.com

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