On his seventh lawyer, Corey Neyrinck was sentenced on Jan. 19, 2018 to seven years in jail for sexually touching two young girls and creating child pornography. After so much time in pre-trial custody, and because of statutory release after two thirds of a sentence, he was released on Dec. 4, 2018.

On his seventh lawyer, Corey Neyrinck was sentenced on Jan. 19, 2018 to seven years in jail for sexually touching two young girls and creating child pornography. After so much time in pre-trial custody, and because of statutory release after two thirds of a sentence, he was released on Dec. 4, 2018.

B.C. man, sentenced to seven years for sexually touching young girls, released after 10.5 months

Victim’s mother outraged she was never formally told of his Dec. 4. release by justice officials

The mother of a young victim of sexual touching is outraged the perpetrator is out of prison just 10-and-a-half months after receiving a seven-year jail sentence.

The Progress has learned that at approximately 1 p.m. on Dec. 4, Corey Bryan James Neyrinck was released from jail with a plan to live in a halfway house in Surrey.

Neyrinck was sentenced on Jan. 19 in B.C. Supreme Court to seven years for sexually touching a person under 16; sexually touching a person under 14; and one count each of producing and possessing child pornography.

Because of delays caused by Neyrinck himself, which included firing or otherwise losing six lawyers, he spent 1,374 days in pre-trial custody before that January sentencing hearing. With the standard 1.5-to-one day of time served, he was given credit for 2,061 days leaving 16 months and seven days to serve.

• READ MORE: Convicted child sex offender’s sixth lawyer resigns in Chilliwack court

With statutory release, which means offenders are released after serving two thirds of a sentence, that brings Neyrinck to this week, a reality that was sprung on a victim’s mother just a day before he was released.

“I just feel I have been kept out of loop for so long,” she told The Progress Tuesday. “This horrendous thing happened to my family but I feel like a stranger not knowing anything until last minute. These victims are children and as their parents we need to keep them safe. How can we do that when we aren’t kept informed?”

Neyrinck’s case garnered broader attention when he was first charged back in 2014 because he is a one-time failed candidate for the Chilliwack school board, and once served as vice-president of the local District Parent Advisory Council.

• READ MORE: Chilliwack school trustee candidate facing child sex charges

He received 54 votes in the 2013 trustee byelection won by Dan Coulter to replace Louise Piper who resigned for medical reasons.

Neyrinck was touching more than one girl for years until one victim finally told students at school about it, the court heard. He also watched pornographic videos with the girl that included child porn, and filmed some of his sexual touching.

On all his computers and electronic devices, Neyrinck was found with 2,326 images and 307 videos that met the legal definition of child pornography.

“He threatened her that if she told her mom he would punch her,” Crown counsel Paul Blessin told the court in January.

While he was out on bail at one point, Neyrinck breached conditions by contacting the victim’s mother, and even faking a lie detector test. He was also caught in an RV with internet access, a further breach.

That victim’s mother said she was told by a relative of Neyrinck on Tuesday that he already has a phone and he has zero conditions on his internet access.

“He’s a dangerous man,” she said. “We have not seen the last of him. They are giving him too much freedom.”

The Progress was unable to confirm his release conditions, but one unusual element of his sentencing was, despite the fact that he was in Supreme Court, he had spent so much time in pre-trial custody that he was left with a provincial (under two years) sentence rather than a federal one. And because federal sentences cannot be accompanied by probation after the time in custody, this led Justice Paul Riley to ask if probation had been considered. Crown and defence said it had not.

“I do have a concern about imposing a sentence that just ends with no supervision after,” Riley said.

In the end, Riley did hand down a one-year probation order including a no-contact order, a ban on attending places where children under 16 might be, and use of internet capable devices only with permission from a probation officer.

This sentence read in court differs from what the victim’s mother said she was told this week regarding Neyrinck’s access to the internet, and his supervision by the courts.

He also does have to register as a sex offender for life.

“I’m sorry and I want to apologize for my actions,” Neyrinck said at the sentencing in January. “I realize what I’ve put everyone through must have been excruciating.

“I believe everybody has the right to feel angry.”

• READ MORE: Chilliwack child sex offender delays his sentencing hearing


@PeeJayAitch
paul.henderson@theprogress.com

Like us on Facebook and follow us on Twitter.

Just Posted

Douglas Holmes, current Alberni-Clayoquot Regional District chief administrative officer, is set to take on that position at the Regional District of Nanaimo come late August. (Submitted photo)
Regional District of Nanaimo’s next CAO keen to work on building partnerships

Douglas Holmes to take over top administrator role with RDN this summer

AW Neill Elementary School in Port Alberni. (NEWS FILE PHOTO)
SD70 chooses new name for AW Neill School in Port Alberni

New name honours Nuu-chah-nulth Peoples’ connection to region

Ron MacDonald fields questions at a news conference in Halifax on Sept. 27, 2011. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Andrew Vaughan
Finding ‘comfortable’ indigenous monitor tough task in Tofino-area shooting death

Julian Jones case hampered by difficulty finding a civilian comfortable with privacy protocols

Port Alberni RCMP officer in command Insp. Eric Rochette presents longtime community policing volunteer Louie Aumair with a OIC appreciation certificate. (SUBMITTED PHOTO)
Port Alberni RCMP honour longtime volunteer

First responders receive support from broader community

The Dock+ is located on Harbour Road in Port Alberni. (SUSAN QUINN / Alberni Valley News)
PROGRESS 2021: Port Alberni’s food hub still growing a year later

The Dock hopes to open a retail store on Alberni’s busy waterfront

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau participates in a plenary session at the G7 Summit in Carbis Bay, England on Friday June 11, 2021. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Adrian Wyld
Canada donating 13M surplus COVID-19 vaccine doses to poor countries

Trudeau says the government will pay for 87 million shots to be distributed to poor countries

David and Collet Stephan leave for a break during an appeal hearing in Calgary on Thursday, March 9, 2017. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Todd Korol
Appeal Court rejects stay for Alberta couple facing third trial in son’s death

Pair accused in their earlier trials of not seeking medical attention for their son sooner

Highway notices like this come down effective June 14. Public health restrictions on non-essential travel and commercial operation have hit local businesses in every corner of B.C. (B.C. government)
Province-wide travel back on in B.C.’s COVID-19 restart plan

Gathering changes include up to 50 people for outdoor events

Calgary Stampeders’ Jerome Messam leaps over a tackle during second half CFL western semifinal football action in Calgary, Sunday, Nov. 15, 2015.THE CANADIAN PRESS/Jeff McIntosh
CFL football will be played this summer in Canada

Governors vote unanimously in favour to start the ‘21 campaign on Aug. 5

Citizenship Minister Marco Mendicino holds a press conference in Ottawa on Thursday, Nov. 12, 2020. The federal government is announcing that Indigenous people can now apply to reclaim their names on passports and other government documents. THE CANADIAN PRESS/Sean Kilpatrick
Indigenous people can now reclaim traditional names on their passports and other ID

Announcement applies to all individuals of First Nations, Inuit and Métis background

Harvesting hay in the Fraser Valley. (Tom Fletcher/Black Press)
COVID-19: B.C. waives farm income requirement for a second year

Property owners don’t need minimum income for 2022 taxes

A view of the outside of St. Andrews Roman Catholic Cathedral on Victoria’s Blanshard Street. (Don Denton/News staff)
Vancouver Island bishop apologizes for church’s role in residential schools

Bishop Gary Gordon of the Diocese of Victoria voices commitment to healing and reconciliation

Cannabis bought in British Columbia (Ashley Wadhwani/Black Press Media)
Is it time to start thinking about greener ways to package cannabis?

Packaging suppliers are still figuring eco-friendly and affordable packaging options that fit the mandates of Cannabis Regulations

Most Read