Letters of the week-March 3.

Life skills and B.C. old growth spurred letters to the editor this week.

Village steps up to teach life skills

To the Editor,

We would like to publicly acknowledge and thank a number of groups and individuals for the support they gave to the ADSS Life Skills student during the exam week of Jan. 25–29. They made such an immense difference in the educational program of our students.

A big thank you goes out to the members of Port Alberni City Council for supplying bus passes that allowed our students to gain the experience and skills needed to use the city public transit system. We had such a great time getting out of the school and exploring our city.

And thank you to the bus drivers we encountered on our travels. They were wonderful. They were always so kind, friendly and helpful.

Kudos to the Alberni Bulldogs hockey players, who took time out of their busy schedules to come and skate with our students. Their act of kindness made such a difference. The students had such a wonderful time skating with the players and it is a memory that will stay with them.

A special thanks to the managers at Quality Foods for giving us a behind- the-scenes tour of the store. The students enjoyed seeing all the different departments that make up a grocery store. And thanks for all those cookies. They were delicious. These guys are indeed awesome.

Caroline Ellis, ADSS Life Skills Dept.

 

Keeping up the land pressure

To the Editor,

Sierra Club activist Mark Worthing (Letters, AV News, Jan. 20) is critical of a Tom Fletcher column against the environmentalist agitation to save more of BC old growth forest (three hectares in the Walbran valley).

Worthing’s sarcasm seeks to decry Fletcher’s column. He asserts the majority of BCers support saving forests for a better life and future jobs. BC has the toughest regulations for forest management yet Worthing promotes distrust and demands more oversight of the harvesting.

This is how the resource economy is impeded: by spreading distrust, making counter claims of management violations, and demanding greater oversight based on science.

Much of environmental activism science is based on data collection that is supportive only of the groomed hypothesis. Assertions are made of planetary disaster and clarion calls for aggressive expensive correction. Conclusive proof of the premise of science will not be realized for decades.

Bruce E. Hornidge,

Port Alberni

 

 

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