Letters of the week – Oct. 6

The royal visit, Cantimber emissions and more spurred on letters to the editor this week.

Colonial-style politics outdated

To the Editor,

The visit by the British royalty was a subtle reminder of our colonial status, and the many challenges we face as a nation to become a free and democratic society, with a constitution that is written by the people.

The day of colonial rule is over, and our colonial style of government is constantly butting heads with our basic human rights to have governments that represent all the people fairly in our legislatures, and changing the electoral system is just the first in many steps toward that reality.

The colonial electoral system was designed to give the government of the day the political muzzle to rule the colonies, not to produce democratic governments.

One of the many challenges facing our society is to bring resolution to First Nations’ claims for lands, resources, and compensations, balanced with the credits and recognition to the people who made Canada what it is today.

The one-sided rulings by the courts and the billions of dollars governments at all levels have awarded defies fairness and common sense, and have one thing in common: none of them have provided closure to anything.

Without closure the wall between the First Nations’ and the rest of Canada will only get bigger, and it will continue to force the First Nations to live in poverty, while the feelings of resentment between the two groups is increasing.

Trying to control people’s emotions with legislation, and to define those sentiments as crimes – of hatred – is about as bizarre as it can get.

Not to mention that it’s a clear violation of our basic human rights to freedom of thought and freedom of expression.

Millions of Canadians are being painted like criminals, and our politicians and the courts have been busy laying one guilt trip on them after another for atrocities they could not possibly have taken any part in.

It’s time to focus on the individuals and groups who committed those crimes and challenge them in the courts.

To continue to penalize Canadian taxpayers, and to mine their pockets to the tune of literally billions of dollars every year is nothing less than a crime in itself and that has to stop.

Other challenges include reforming the Senate or dropping it, adopting a justice system with the single purpose of enforcing the laws, a system that is accountable to the people – not just itself.

With electoral reform as the first stop, the train of change has left the Station.

Andy Thomsen,

Peachland, BC

 

Cantimber questions unanswered

To the Editor,

Cantimber and the Port Alberni Port Authority (PAPA) can’t just sweep what happened under the rug. How can they be “focusing on improving the process rather than analyzing past emissions?” You can’t start with a clean slate and go forward without knowing where you’ve come from.

How can you correct or improve the process, if you don’t know what happened? It was “the emissions” that shut Cantimber down in the first place.

We want to know what Cantimber put in the air we breathe that made us sick. We have a right to know.

To me, this is a prime example of utter disregard and irresponsibility in this community that I am fed up with.

Why in heavens name would we want Cantimber to continue conducting experimental research here, when they are hiding what they already did to us? Who in their right minds wants Cantimber to continue to treat us as subjects of experimentation, as though we are lab rats? How is this even legal?

There will never be social license for Cantimber to conduct experimental research in the centre of our city.

Cantimber’s experimental research facility is surrounded by a community of families that have already been affected with illness because of these scientific experiments. The damage is done. No matter how you slice it, experimental research is for labs, not neighbourhoods.

PAPA says that the “public can assist” with this issue. Well, we will. We will attend the public meeting on Oct. 13 and tell Cantimber and PAPA they are not welcome to continue doing experimental research in our community.

They need to “Get Out of Town,” take their experiments to a location far from people so if accidents happen again, if malfunctions happen again, if human error happens again, it won’t hurt anyone.

Stacey Gaiga,

Port Alberni

 

Global Fund a success

To the Editor,

The Global Fund sounds like another boring initiative, until you put a face to the success of this program.

One need only google the name Loyce Maturu to realize that Canada’s investment in the Global Fund is one of the most important investments we could ever make. Millions of lives have been saved, and Loyce’s life is among them.

Connie Lebeau,

Victoria, BC

 

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